What are three quotes that show how Juliet is impulsive in Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet?

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Given the fact that Romeo is from an opposing and feuding house, Montague, and Juliet is a Capulet, her initial draw to him flies in the face of her self-identity and self-interest and has no rhyme or reason other than impulse. Indeed, the love is so strong that Juliet...

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Given the fact that Romeo is from an opposing and feuding house, Montague, and Juliet is a Capulet, her initial draw to him flies in the face of her self-identity and self-interest and has no rhyme or reason other than impulse. Indeed, the love is so strong that Juliet cannot help but act on it in defiance of ramifications, beliefs, and values. This is clear when Juliet, having only just seen Romeo and learned of his background, declares:

My only love sprung from my only hate!
Too early seen unknown and known to late!
Prodigious birth of love it is to me
That I must love a loathed enemy! (I, v, 136-139)

Such is the power of this impulse—it makes her love whom she should rationally hate and seek whom she should practically avoid.

Being drawn to Romeo in defiance of reason in particular serves to highlight the impetuosity at the crux of her attraction. This conflict between impulse and reason is clearly played out in the following quote of Juliet:

I have no joy of this contract tonight:
It is too rash, too unadvised, too sudden;
Too like the lightning, which doth cease to be
Ere one can say "It lightens." (II, ii, 117-120)

Moreover, here she realizes that her love for Romeo is as impetuous as the natural force of Nature that is lightning, for it can neither be controlled nor tempered by the intervention of mortal reason.

Lastly, Juliet betrays the full extent of this impulsive love's sway over her when she declares:

Be not so long to speak. I long to die
If what thou speak'st speak not of remedy. (IV, i, 66-67)

Thus she reveals that to not satisfy the impulse which has possession over her is worse than death. She at this juncture has a knife in her hand and expresses she would rather die than live without resolution to her romantic passion. As such, every fiber of her being, her very existence is overtaken by the overwhelming need to heed the impulsive love for Romeo.

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After Romeo and Juliet meet, kiss, and speak briefly, Juliet asks her Nurse to find out what his name is. While the Nurse leaves her to ask, Juliet says,

If he be married,
My grave is like to be my wedding bed. (1.5.148-149)

In other words, she says that if the Nurse tells her that he is already married, then Juliet will never marry anyone, ever. Her wedding bed will actually be her grave. This is a pretty impulsive statement, as Juliet is only thirteen and she has only just met Romeo, and yet she is willing to make such a dramatic statement.

When the Nurse returns and tells Juliet that he is the son of her family's enemy, Juliet says,

My only love sprung from my only hate! (1.5.152)

Again, Juliet's impulsivity leads her to make a statement that implies she will never love another: Romeo will be her "only love," despite her youth and the very early stage of their relationship (if we can even call it a relationship at this point!). She believes herself to be utterly in love after having only exchanged a few words and kisses with a young man, and, moreover, she cannot imagine that she will ever love again.

Later, on her balcony, Juliet speaks to herself, believing that no one else is around to hear her. In part, she says, addressing her remarks to Romeo (who she does not realize is there),

[...] be but sworn my love,
And I'll no longer be a Capulet. (2.2.38-39)

Here, again, after having only exchanged a few words and kisses, and despite her knowledge that loving Romeo would be totally unacceptable to her family, Juliet is ready to completely leave her family and join his. If he is willing to accept her love, she is impulsively ready, now, to give up her family and her life to join his.

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Juliet is not an impulsive person until she meets and falls in love with Romeo.  Her first act of impulse is her decision to marry a boy she has only just met, in Act 2 Scene 2 (end of the balcony scene):

JULIET
Three words, dear Romeo, and good night indeed.
If that thy bent of love be honourable,
Thy purpose marriage, send me word tomorrow,
By one that I'll procure to come to thee,
Where and what time thou wilt perform the rite;
And all my fortunes at thy foot I'll lay
And follow thee my lord throughout the world.

The next impulsive move she makes is in Act 3 Scene 5, after Romeo has killed Tybalt.  Her father has promised her in marriage to Paris (within 3 days) and she resolves to get out of this with the help of the Friar or by killing herself:

JULIET
So many thousand times? Go, counsellor;
Thou and my bosom henceforth shall be twain.
I'll to the friar, to know his remedy;
If all else fail, myself have power to die.

Then, of course, finally, in Act 5 Scene 3, when she sees that Romeo has killed himself, she kills herself:

JULIET
Yea, noise? Then I'll be brief. O happy dagger!

[Snatching Romeo's dagger.]

This is thy sheath; [Stabs herself.] there rust, and let me die.

[Falls on Romeo's body, and dies.]

 

 

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