What are three quotes concerning coming of age in To Kill a Mockingbird? I need specific quotes that characters said in the novel.

One quote that concerns coming of age in To Kill a Mockingbird is Calpurnia saying to Scout,

I just can't help it if Mister Jem's growin' up. He's gonna want to be off to himself a lot now, doin' whatever boys do, so you just come right on in the kitchen when you feel lonesome.

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Scout and Jem's coming of age is a theme that suffuses much of To Kill a Mockingbird. The two come to realize the complexity and horror of the adult world, as well as the injustices of Maycomb (and by extension, 1930s southern American) society.

One way in which the Finch children come of age is in their more complicated outlook on values such as courage. Unpleasant interactions with the harsh and sharp-tongued Mrs. Dubose initially leave Scout and Jem with nothing even approaching a positive impression. However, Atticus reveals she was battling a morphine addiction and sought to conquer it before she died. His words regarding her courage redefine what courage is for his children, who tend to associate the virtue with physical daring:

real courage is ... when you know you're licked before you begin but you begin anyway and you see it through no matter what.

Another good quote about coming of age relates to Scout's understanding of Mayella Ewell during the trial. Though Mayella's lies and cruel words are undoubtedly wrong, as Tom Robinson explains how Mayella sought out his companionship, Scout is able to perceive her in a complex way because she realizes the young woman has been abused and neglected to the point that she was willing to break social taboos to alleviate her isolation:

As Tom Robinson gave his testimony, it came to me that Mayella Ewell must have been the loneliest person in the world. She was even lonelier than Boo Radley, who had not been out of the house in twenty-five years.

This is a major development, since Scout has tended to take a more simplistic approach to people she found unpleasant (such as her new schoolteacher) in the past.

Lastly, Scout's maturity is emphasized when she reiterates her father's advice from earlier in the novel, right as she approaches Boo Radley without fear for the first time:

Atticus was right. One time he said you never really know a man until you stand in his shoes and walk around in them. Just standing on the Radley porch was enough.

That she is now able to fully comprehend what her father meant shows she is coming of age in a significant way.

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At the beginning of part 2 of the novel, Scout sees that Jem is beginning to change. She states,

Overnight, it seemed, Jem had acquired an alien set of values and was trying to impose them on me: several times he went so far as to tell me what to do.

This reflects Jem entering adolescence or beginning to come of age. He now is beginning to think of himself as an adult and Scout as a child rather than of himself as just her older brother.

When Scout goes to Calpurnia in distress about the changes that have come over Jem, Calpurnia confirms he is maturing, saying,

I just can't help it if Mister Jem's growin' up. He's gonna want to be off to himself a lot now, doin' whatever boys do, so you just come right on in the kitchen when you feel lonesome.

Jem's entry into adolescence coincides with the Tom Robinson trial. Because he sees white adults in his community acting badly about the trial, such as convicting Tom despite all the evidence that shows he is innocent, Jem takes the outcome very hard. When he reacts harshly to Scout questioning him about racial hypocrisy and refuses to answer her, she goes to Atticus. He explains to her that while Jem is going through the process of coming of age, there are certain things he won't want to deal with, such as the town's racism, until he is a little older. In the meantime, he will be difficult:

Atticus said that Jem was trying hard to forget something, but what he was really doing was storing it away for a while, until enough time passed. Then he would be able to think about it and sort things out. When he was able to think about it, Jem would be himself again.

Both children mature over the course of the novel. Evidence of Scout's maturity comes at the end of the novel when she stands on Boo Radley's porch and is able to see the world through his eyes for the first time. She comes to understand that

Atticus was right. One time he said you never really know a man until you stand in his shoes and walk around in them. Just standing on the Radley porch was enough.

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The ultimate tomboy, Scout discovers her feminine side when she meets Dill Harris, and they soon become intimate, even spending an innocent night together sharing her bed. But when Scout discovers that Dill won't be coming to Maycomb for the summer, she is "crushed."

The fact that I had a permanent fiance was little compensation for his absence: I had never thought about it, but summer was Dill... summer was the swiftness with which Dill would reach up and kiss me when Jem was not looking, the longings we sometimes felt each other feel. With him, life was routine; without him, life was unbearable.

Scout is constantly harrassed by her Aunt Alexandra about her need to act more ladylike. When she is invited to attend the Missionary Circle tea, Scout dresses in her Sunday best, but the women make several jokes at her expense, especially concerning the whereabouts of her overalls. By the end of the afternoon, Scout realizes that many of these Christian women could use some lessons in etiquette themselves. After Atticus brings the news about Tom's death, she watches how Miss Maudie and Alexandra recompose themselves and go on with the business of serving refreshments. Scout is impressed: It is a real breakthrough and she realizes

... if Aunty could be a lady at a time like this, so could I.

Scout's fantasies about Boo Radley finally come true at the end of the novel. She sees him in the flesh, makes small talk with him on the porch swing, and then walks him back to his house. It's another step in the process of becoming a lady.

... if Miss Stephanie Crawford was watching from her upstairs window, she would see Arthur Radley escorting me down the sidewalk, as any gentleman would do.

 

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