What are three examples of when Abigail lied in The Crucible?

Abigail Williams lies when she falsely accuses Tituba of working for the devil along with Sarah Good, Goody Osburn, and Bridget Bishop. Abigail also lies when she falsely accuses Elizabeth Proctor of attempted murder and denies having an affair with John.

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At the beginning of the play, Abigail lies to her uncle when he asks what she was doing in the woods with the girls. Abigail lies by saying, "We did dance, uncle, and when you leaped out of the bush so suddenly, Betty was frightened and then she fainted. And...

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At the beginning of the play, Abigail lies to her uncle when he asks what she was doing in the woods with the girls. Abigail lies by saying, "We did dance, uncle, and when you leaped out of the bush so suddenly, Betty was frightened and then she fainted. And there is the whole of it." Abigail did much more than dance in the woods with several of her friends. The girls hoped that Tituba could conjure spirits and Abigail tried to put a deadly charm on Elizabeth Proctor by drinking chicken blood. Abigail then tells a second lie by saying, "But we never conjured spirits." This is untrue because Ruth Putnam was sent by her mother to see if Tituba could contact the spirits of her seven deceased siblings.

Reverend Parris then asks his niece if there is any other reason why Elizabeth Proctor let her go. Abigail tells another lie by saying that Elizabeth let her go because she would not work like a slave. According to Abigail, Elizabeth is a cold, sniveling woman, who is spreading false rumors about her. The real reason Elizabeth fired Abigail is that she discovered Abigail was having an affair with her husband. Abigail is still very much in love with John and tries to tempt him when he visits Parris's home. When Reverend Hale arrives from Beverly and begins his investigation, Abigail uses Tituba as a scapegoat and lies by saying, "She makes me drink blood!" Abigail proceeds to tell more lies by saying, "She [Tituba] sends her spirit on me in church; she makes me laugh at prayer!" Abigail continues to lie and eventually accuses several innocent citizens of being involved in witchcraft. Abigail continues to lie as the play progresses and is the leading figure in the witch trials.

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In Arthur Miller's classic play The Crucible, Abigail Williams is portrayed as a deceitful, selfish young woman, who falsely accuses innocent citizens of witchcraft to avoid punishment and elevate her social status. Throughout the play, Abigail tells numerous lies, which endanger the well-being of others and contribute to the witchcraft hysteria that consumes Salem. In act one, Abigail lies to her uncle regarding the events that transpired the previous night in the forest. Abigail lies by claiming that Tituba was simply singing Barbados songs and denies that any of the girls were naked. The truth was that Tituba was attempting to conjure the spirits of Ruth Putnam's deceased siblings and help Abigail place a harmful spell on Elizabeth Proctor. When Abigail feels threatened, she lies by claiming that Tituba works for the devil and has sent her spirit to influence her several times. Abigail also lies by saying that she saw Sarah Good, Goody Osburn, and Bridget Bishop with the devil.

In act two, Abigail stabs herself in the stomach with a needle and tells a lie by falsely accusing Elizabeth Proctor of attempted murder. Abigail claims that Elizabeth sent her spirit to murder her. However, the audience recognizes that Abigail is attempting to have John Proctor to herself. In act three, Abigail lies by denying that she had an affair with John Proctor and pretends that Mary Warren's spirit is about to attack her. Overall, Abigail Williams tells numerous lies, which have serious implications and result in the tragic deaths of innocent civilians.

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Abigail first lies to her uncle, Reverend Parris, in Act One, when she tells him that she and the other girls "never conjured spirits."  Mrs. Putnam soon after tells him that she sent her daughter, Ruth Putnam, to Parris's slave, Tituba, to conjure the spirits of Mrs. Putnam's dead babies to find out who murdered them.  In other words, they were absolutely conjuring spirits in the woods before Betty Parris became ill.

She lies again in Act One when she insists, "There be no blush about my name."  Parris has confronted her with the rumor that Elizabeth Proctor will not sit near something "so soiled" in church, but Abigail insists that she has an untarnished reputation.  She knows very well that her affair with the married John Proctor would absolutely blacken her name in the village.

Abigail lies again, just a short time later, when she tells Betty, "I told [your father] everything; he knows now [...]."  Betty is frantic and yells back that Abigail didn't admit to drinking blood and working a charm to kill Elizabeth Proctor; in other words, Abby tries to lie to Betty about confessing the whole truth to Parris, and Betty knows that she has not.

Honestly, the list goes on and on.  She lies when she says that Tituba is a witch, when she claims that she herself has been with the Devil, when she accuses other women of being witches, when she testifies against Elizabeth Proctor and Mary Warren, and on and on. 

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