What are three examples of totalitarianism within 1984 by George Orwell? Include a quote from the book for each one.

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Like most totalitarian states, Oceania has a supreme leader to whom everyone is expected to give their total loyalty and obedience—not to mention adoration. In Oceania, this is Big Brother. His image is everywhere. This larger than life figure is supposed to be the epitome of all that is good....

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Like most totalitarian states, Oceania has a supreme leader to whom everyone is expected to give their total loyalty and obedience—not to mention adoration. In Oceania, this is Big Brother. His image is everywhere. This larger than life figure is supposed to be the epitome of all that is good. He also represents the power of the state to look into and control every aspect of a person's life. In the quote below, we note that posters of Big Brother are plastered all over, with the warning that, like God, Big Brother knows all:

The black mustachioed face gazed down from every commanding corner. There was one on the house-front immediately opposite. BIG BROTHER IS WATCHING YOU, the caption said

After Winston is arrested, O'Brien tells him that one of the four emotions people will eventually be allowed—along with fear, hate, and triumph—is adoration of Big Brother. Big Brother is an amalgam of Hitler and Stalin, two totalitarian dictators who were projected as all-wise and all-powerful Godlike leaders.

Be it Jews, capitalists, or other hated figures, totalitarian regimes use propaganda to redirect the aggressions that a repressive government builds up in the population. Oceania is true to form and leads outer party members in group hate sessions directed at the identified source of all evil, Emmanuel Goldstein:

The next moment a hideous, grinding speech, as of some monstrous machine running without oil, burst from the big telescreen at the end of the room. It was a noise that set one's teeth on edge and bristled the hair at the back of one's neck. The Hate had started....Emmanuel Goldstein, the Enemy of the People, had flashed on to the screen

Another hallmark of totalitarianism is the sudden disappearance of people deemed threats to the state. Secret arrests were common in both Stalinist Russia and Nazi Germany and are of part of the terrifying power of totalitarianism. In Oceania, the sudden disappearance of individuals is also commonplace:

People simply disappeared, always during the night. Your name was removed from the registers, every record of everything you had ever done was wiped out, and your one-time existence was denied and then forgotten.

As Winston points out early on, there are no laws, so at any moment, any person can be violating the orthodoxy of the state and be subject to arrest. This keeps people in a constant state of fear.

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Totalitarianism refers to a style of government that is based on a dictatorship and expects complete subservience from its citizens. There are lots of example of this in 1984.

First of all, the Party uses "telescreens" to monitor the every movement of its citizens. This means that they are under constant surveillance and lack any freedom over their own actions. Here's a quote related to how it is used by the Party:

The instrument (the telescreen, it was called) could be dimmed, but there was no way of shutting it off completely.

Secondly, the Party rewrites history so that it has total control over the information given to its citizens. By doing this, the people only know what the Party tells them, and they have no opportunity to educate themselves on what is really going on. Winston, for example, is constantly tasked with rewriting history, so that the Party appears to be always right and always fair:

Winston’s job was to rectify the original figures by making them agree with the later ones.

Finally, the Ministry of Love, particularly Room 101, ensures that all citizens do not flout Party rules. The constant fear of violence keeps them in a state of total submission. Even Winston, a man desperate to break free of Party control, yields to the Party when they take him to Room 101. This leads to his betrayal of Julia, something he swore he would never do:

"Do it to Julia! Do it to Julia! Not me! Julia!"

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George Orwell's dystopian society of 1984 represents an oligarchy which has eliminated the fundamental characteristics of a democratic society. With the powerful machinery of big government, the human spirit is crushed in the eradication of privacy, individuality, and freedom. 

1. There is a complete loss of privacy as individuals are watched even in their homes

As the novel opens the main character, Winston Smth, sets his face

into the expression of quiet optimism which it was adviable to wear when facing the telescreen.

Once he enters his apartment, Winston moves into an alcove where, if he sits back, he is able to stay outside the range of telescreen where "Big Brother is watching you" and his activities are make known to authorities. This small space of privacy is where Winston writes in his diary.

2. Certain programs are in place to take away individualism

The program of the "Two Minutes Hate" unites people in a single emotion, crushing their individual feelings, as they all express hatred for Goldstein who is shown on the large screen. So swept away are the people in this unified emotion that their hate turns to others before they leave the assembly.

A hideous ecstasy of fear and vindictiveness, a desire to kill, to torture, to smash faces in with a sledge hammer, seemed to flow through the whole group of people...turning one even against one's will like an electric current, turning one even against one's will into a grimacing, screaming lunatic.

3. Freedom is eradicated by the government spying, through Newspeak, and through the institution of "Thoughtcrime."

Winston Smith hides his diary because it is a crime to express one's personal thoughts. His writing of "DOWN WITH BIG BROTHER" and his writing 

Freedom is the freedom to say that two plus two make four. If that is granted, all else follows

is what is Winston's nemesis. After he is caught for being with Julia, Winston's diary is confiscated and O'Brien tortures Winston until he finally breaks and becomes convinced that 2+2=5.

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