The Hound of the Baskervilles by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

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What are the two unusual facts about Sir Charles's death in The Hound of the Baskervilles?

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Lenny Wiza eNotes educator | Certified Educator

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The baronet Sir Charles is literally scared to death by his murderer; it is an ingenious plan that likely would have gone undetected by anyone less brilliant than Sherlock Holmes. Sir Charles is found dead in his manor park of an apparent heart attack, though the expression of horror frozen on his face suggests that the circumstances had a sinister cast.

Because large pawprints are found near the body and there has been a persistent local legend of a ghostly hound that prowls the local moors, some are willing to accept that the curse upon the Baskervilles has claimed one more victim of this noble family. The circumstantial evidence that satisfies some only deepens Holmes's suspicion that the Baskerville deaths are the result of a person with an agenda. The resolution of the story confirms Holmes's suspicions, as Jack Stapleton is found to be a legitimate heir to the Baskerville estate who has been systematically picking off his relatives.

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Sir Charles's body was found out near the moor. The police report stated that he was out walking towards the moor but everyone knew that he never went walking at night. He was deathly afraid of the curse placed upon his family and the "hellhound" that haunted the moor. Therefore, he would have never gone walking at night of his own accord. 

The police report also stated that there were no footprints near his body, but there were. There were tracks of dogs near his body. 

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