What are the three most important problems in The Horse and His Boy?

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A central problem that occupies all the characters is release from oppression. Shasta, the boy of the title, is both enslaved and fearful; he decides to leave what he considers home in hopes of finding freedom and security. While the talking horses are free in many ways, they have been...

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A central problem that occupies all the characters is release from oppression. Shasta, the boy of the title, is both enslaved and fearful; he decides to leave what he considers home in hopes of finding freedom and security. While the talking horses are free in many ways, they have been forced to serve in wars. They also live in fear that their ability to speak will be discovered, because they will be exploited and treated as freaks.

Closely related to the overall problem is how they will escape. The novel relates their adventures in fleeing from Calormen. A third problem is more psychological than practical. As the foursome travels together, they must learn how to think as a unit and avoid conflict. Not only must they suppress any individual personality traits that would impede cooperation amongst themselves, they must anticipate and counteract any behaviors that might result in their capture.

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