What are the similes and metaphors in lines 103–112 of Robert Frost's poem "The Death of the Hired Man?"

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In this stanza, we reach a brief pause or interlude, lasting for all but the last two lines, in the debate between Mary and Warren over Silas. Silas has arrived while Warren is gone. Mary wants to let him stay, and Warren wants him to leave.

In the interlude, the narrator provides a lovely description of the moonlight that spills out and lights the scene as Mary and Warren sit together on the porch discussing Silas.

A metaphor is a comparison that does not use the words "like" or "as," while a simile is a comparison that does use the words "like" or "as." Frost writes a simile when he calls the morning glory "strings" "harp-like." Morning glories are normally trained to climb up the posts of porches or up trellises. The vines that climb straight up can look like strings, especially when the morning glory flowers are closed up for the night. In the moonlight, the morning glory vines look to Mary like the strings on a harp as she reaches out and touches them.

This leads to a second simile, in...

(The entire section contains 4 answers and 808 words.)

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