What are the poetic techniques in the following monologue? "God’s bread! It makes me mad. Day, night, hour, tide, time, work, play, Alone, in company, still my care hath been To have her matched. And having now provided A gentleman of noble parentage, Of fair demesnes, youthful, and nobly trained, Stuffed, as they say, with honorable parts, Proportioned as one’s thought would wish a man— And then to have a wretched puling fool, A whining mammet, in her fortune’s tender, To answer 'I’ll not wed,' 'I cannot love,' 'I am too young,' 'I pray you, pardon me.'— But, an you will not wed, I’ll pardon you. Graze where you will, you shall not house with me. Look to ’t, think on ’t, I do not use to jest. Thursday is near. Lay hand on heart, advise. An you be mine, I’ll give you to my friend. An you be not, hang, beg, starve, die in the streets, For, by my soul, I’ll ne'er acknowledge thee, Nor what is mine shall never do thee good. Trust to ’t, bethink you. I’ll not be forsworn."

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Overall, throughout his speech, Capulet appeals to pathos, or emotion, in trying to persuade his daughter to his opinion. He does so by emphasizing his own attentiveness to the cause of getting “her matched.” He also uses logos , or logic, as he points out that Parris has as...

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Overall, throughout his speech, Capulet appeals to pathos, or emotion, in trying to persuade his daughter to his opinion. He does so by emphasizing his own attentiveness to the cause of getting “her matched.” He also uses logos, or logic, as he points out that Parris has as many good qualities “as one’s thought would wish.”

Among the literary devices that Juliet’s father uses are metaphor, as he calls her a “mammet,” meaning a doll or puppet, and says that she can “graze,” meaning “eat,” but using a word generally used for animal behavior. Capulet also uses several types of repetition. One of these is asyndeton, repetition of words without a conjunction where one would customarily be used. He does this twice in the lists of actions joined only by commas where the last two would usually take “and.” In the first list, he also uses juxtaposition, alternating opposites, such as day and night, for emphasis.

Day, night, hour, tide, time, work, play,

Alone, in company . . .

[H]ang, beg, starve, die . . .

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Shakespeare uses anaphora in this passage, a poetic device in which the same words are repeated in successive lines. In this case, Lord Capulet repeats the words "An you be:"

An you be mine, I’ll give you to my friend.
An you be not, hang, beg, starve, die in the streets

This repetition, ironically, emphasizes the antithesis, or opposition, that Capulet is establishing. He is saying here that if Juliet is his (i.e., part of his family and under his protection) she will marry: she will allow him to "give you [Juliet] to my friend." If she is "not" her father's, ie, if she is disobedient to his will, he will put her out on the streets to "hang, beg, starve, die."

This passage also uses mockery: Capulet is involved in an angry, out-of-control tirade against Juliet for her refusal to marry Paris, a dialogue that is witnessed by Lady Capulet and the Nurse as well as Juliet. Within the tirade he mimics Juliet's words to him of refusal to marry, hurling them back at her as epithets, a literary term which means words of abuse:

'I’ll not wed,' 'I cannot love,'
'I am too young,' 'I pray you, pardon me.'

We know he is mocking and insulting her because he has just termed her a "whining mammet [doll]," or what we might call an entitled princess.

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In this monologue, Lord Capulet is raging on about his daughter, Juliet's, lack of obedience to him.  He has ordered her to marry Count Parris, and she has refused. 

He employs hyperbole, or exaggeration, in order to express how carefully he has attempted to find her a spouse who would be her match.  He says, "Day, night, hour, tide, time, work, play, / Alone, in company, still my care hath been
/ To have her matched."  It's as though he has only ever thought of this and nothing but this, and he tries to show how much thought has been put into his decision (compared to her careless rejection of it). 

Capulet then compares Parris to something "Stuffed," like a doll (since humans are not "stuffed"), via metaphor, saying that he is "Stuffed [...] with honorable parts" and made to perfect proportion.  Then, in his next metaphor, he compares Juliet to an empty puppet, or a "whining mammet," one who is weak and stupid and yet objects to this wonderful fortune her parents have made for her.

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