Romeo and Juliet Questions and Answers
by William Shakespeare

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What are the poetic techniques in the following monologue? "God’s bread! It makes me mad. Day, night, hour, tide, time, work, play, Alone, in company, still my care hath been To have her matched. And having now provided A gentleman of noble parentage, Of fair demesnes, youthful, and nobly trained, Stuffed, as they say, with honorable parts, Proportioned as one’s thought would wish a man— And then to have a wretched puling fool, A whining mammet, in her fortune’s tender, To answer 'I’ll not wed,' 'I cannot love,' 'I am too young,' 'I pray you, pardon me.'— But, an you will not wed, I’ll pardon you. Graze where you will, you shall not house with me. Look to ’t, think on ’t, I do not use to jest. Thursday is near. Lay hand on heart, advise. An you be mine, I’ll give you to my friend. An you be not, hang, beg, starve, die in the streets, For, by my soul, I’ll ne'er acknowledge thee, Nor what is mine shall never do thee good. Trust to ’t, bethink you. I’ll not be forsworn."

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Overall, throughout his speech, Capulet appeals to pathos, or emotion, in trying to persuade his daughter to his opinion. He does so by emphasizing his own attentiveness to the cause of getting “her matched.” He also uses logos, or logic, as he points out that Parris has as many good qualities “as one’s thought would wish.”

Among the literary devices that Juliet’s father uses are metaphor, as he calls her a “mammet,” meaning a doll or puppet, and says that she can “graze,” meaning “eat,” but using a word generally used for animal behavior. Capulet also uses several types of repetition. One of these is asyndeton, repetition of words without a conjunction where one would customarily be used. He does this twice in the lists of actions joined only by commas where the last two would usually take “and.” In the first list, he also uses juxtaposition, alternating opposites, such as day and night, for emphasis.

Day, night, hour, tide, time, work, play,

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