What are the moral values for the poem "If—" by Rudyard Kipling? I would like to have an example for each moral value.

Some of the moral values Rudyard Kipling recommends in "If—" are calmness, stoicism, self-confidence, tolerance, patience, honesty, modesty, courage, tenacity, and industry.

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Rudyard Kipling's "If—" is a counsel of perfection which is filled with exhortations to virtue. Some of the moral values he recommends are as follows:

Calmness and Stoicism: These are emphasized from the first line. You should try to remain calm when everyone around you is panicking. Stoicism is continually referenced throughout the poem, as when the reader is advised to treat "Triumph and Disaster" in the same way. Finally, no one must be able to harm you significantly, "neither foes nor loving friends."

Self-confidence: You should be able to "trust yourself when all men doubt you."

Tolerance: You should also "make allowance for their doubting" rather than blaming them for it.

Patience: You ought to be able to "wait and not be tired by waiting." You should also be able to rebuild "with worn-out tools," the things that you have built and others have destroyed.

Honesty: You must not lie, even if others lie about you. You must also be able to "keep your virtue" even in the face of the...

(The entire section contains 4 answers and 896 words.)

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