What are the literary devices in "A Red, Red Rose" by Robert Burns?

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Many similes are used in Robert Burns' poem "A Red, Red Rose". The first one, the title, compares love to a rose. It is an obvious comparison to the beauty and delicacy of the flower. The second simile is "My love is like a melody that's sweetly...

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Many similes are used in Robert Burns' poem "A Red, Red Rose". The first one, the title, compares love to a rose. It is an obvious comparison to the beauty and delicacy of the flower. The second simile is "My love is like a melody that's sweetly sung in tune". Here Burns compares love to a song that contains no discord. It is also important to deconstruct that he does not say "harmony". He uses the word "melody" which insinuates to primary attraction of the song, so to say. The melody is what the listener pays the most attention to and recognizes more easily. There are a couple to get you started. Try looking for more similes and metaphors in the poem.

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