Me Talk Pretty One Day

by David Sedaris
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What are the key points of Me Talk Pretty One Day?

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In Me Talk Pretty One Day, David Sedaris makes key points about the support of family and home, the need to discover one's own identity, and the importance of belonging. Let's look at each of these in turn.

No matter where Sedaris goes in the world or what he...

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In Me Talk Pretty One Day, David Sedaris makes key points about the support of family and home, the need to discover one's own identity, and the importance of belonging. Let's look at each of these in turn.

No matter where Sedaris goes in the world or what he does, his family is always there to support him, even if his parents and siblings don't always agree with him. When Sedaris got involved in drugs, for instance, he could return to his family for help and be assured that they would see him through. In the essays in this book, Sedaris may poke fun at his family (like his brother Paul's cursing, for instance), but he also shows how the relationships between his family members and himself have grown and deepened over the years. Sedaris has always been able to count on his family in all its strangeness and love.

Sedaris also focuses on the need to discover one's own identity. When he was a young person, for instance, Sedaris had a speech impediment. He felt that it kept him from fitting in with his classmates, but he had to learn how to accept himself for who he is as a person, even with his flaws. Sedaris became involved in drugs because of his insecurity and struggles, and to move beyond his addiction, he again had to accept himself as a person and embrace his individuality, realizing that drugs were actually preventing him from becoming the person he was meant to be.

Finally, Sedaris recognizes the need for belonging. In several essays, he speaks of being rejected by one person or another through the years and coming to believe that he was never good enough. He discovers, however, that unless he accepts himself, he will never really belong. As he reflects on this idea of belonging, Sedaris writes humorously about his experiences in France as he tries to learn French and fit into the French community.

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