Alasdair MacIntyre

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What are the key points in Marxism: An Interpretation by Alasdair MacIntyre?

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Marxism: An Interpretation was Alasdair MacIntyre's first book (in 1953), and he wrote it as a young scholar still coming to terms with his acceptance of Marxist principles and dealing with issues surrounding them.

In this book, MacIntyre begins by looking at Marx's early life, admiring Marx's work during...

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Marxism: An Interpretation was Alasdair MacIntyre's first book (in 1953), and he wrote it as a young scholar still coming to terms with his acceptance of Marxist principles and dealing with issues surrounding them.

In this book, MacIntyre begins by looking at Marx's early life, admiring Marx's work during that period. He then goes on to point out flaws in Marx's theory of exploitation, noting that, while many of his points stand, this theory "has been falsified by events." Many Marxists, however, refuse to let go of what has been proven to be a faulty theory, and this, MacIntyre argues, has actually "corrupted" Marxism. Its adherents must allow their ideas to be "measured by the facts."

MacIntyre further critiques the Marxist inability to respond to the abuses that Marxism has led to in Marxist regimes around the world. Marxists tend to reject morality as merely ideological, yet they must still respond to the moral criticism the abuses call forth. They often cannot do so, and this is a problem.

MacIntyre also makes the point that, despite assertions to the contrary, religious concepts do enter into Marxist thought. These must be recognized and studied if Marxist ideas are to be properly understood and further developed.

Finally, MacIntyre looks at how the radical politics of Marxism can combine with nonconformist religion to meet the needs and work for the good of the common people.

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