What are the internal conflicts in The Misfits?

Internal conflicts in The Misfits by James Howe include Bobby's quest for identity apart from the names he is called, Addie's inability to define her high ideals, Joe's issues with sexual identity, Skeezie's split between external appearance and internal reality, and Mr. Kellerman's feelings of loss.

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Internal conflicts stand at the very heart of James Howe's novel The Misfits . Before we talk about these conflicts, let's be sure we know what an internal conflict actually is. An internal conflict occurs when a character struggles with their own identity, ideas, beliefs, and actions. The character...

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Internal conflicts stand at the very heart of James Howe's novel The Misfits. Before we talk about these conflicts, let's be sure we know what an internal conflict actually is. An internal conflict occurs when a character struggles with their own identity, ideas, beliefs, and actions. The character feels pulled in multiple directions and must use the conflict to discover who they really are as a person.

In The Misfits, Bobby Goodspeed experiences internal conflict as he tries to get past the names he is called by other students and embrace his own identity. Bobby must also deal with internal conflict when he prepares to give his speech for the No-Name Party. He is nervous even though he feels strongly about what he has to say, and he is even more nervous when he finds out that his dad will be in the audience. His dad assures Bobby that he will not embarrass his son, but that isn't what Bobby is worried about. “It's not you embarrassing me,” he tells his father, “It's me embarrassing you.” Bobby lacks self-confidence, but he finds it as he stands up to speak, knowing that what he says is something his classmates really need to hear.

The other members of the Gang of Five also face internal conflicts. Addie has many high ideals about freedom and equality, but they are vague, and she struggles to define them and to define herself. Joe struggles with sexual identity. Skeezie presents the external image of a hooligan with his spiky hair and leather, but in reality he is far from it.

Internal conflict is not limited to young people. Bobby's boss, Mr. Kellerman, is also conflicted, especially when his mother dies. He has spent years caring for her, and now he feels lost, with no one to listen to and no identity of his own. Bobby tells Mr. Kellerman to listen to himself.

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