What are the important quotes Of Mice and Men in chapter 1? Please give quotes from chapter 1 and explain them.

Important quotes in chapter 1 of Of MIce and Men set the scene by the Salinas River and establish the relationship between George and Lennie. One quote introduces the story of the dream farm, a recurrent motif in which the two men dream of how they will "live off the fatta the lan'.". Other important quotes describe the two men. George is "small and quick," while Lennie is "a huge man."

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An important quote occurs in the first paragraph as the narrator describes the idyllic natural spot by the Salinas River where George and Lennie camp before heading to work at a nearby ranch. This setting is important because it provides a utopic contrast to the dangerous and uneasy feeling of...

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An important quote occurs in the first paragraph as the narrator describes the idyllic natural spot by the Salinas River where George and Lennie camp before heading to work at a nearby ranch. This setting is important because it provides a utopic contrast to the dangerous and uneasy feeling of the ranch. Nature is also associated strongly with Lennie, who feels a deep affinity with natural creatures. This setting bookends the novella and represents an arena of peace and refuge for the men:

On one side of the river the golden foothill slopes curve up to the strong and rocky Gabilan mountains, but on the valley side the water is lined with trees—willows fresh and green with every spring, carrying in their lower leaf junctures the debris of the winter’s flooding; and sycamores with mottled, white, recumbent limbs and branches that arch over the pool. On the sandy bank under the trees the leaves lie deep and so crisp that a lizard makes a great skittering if he runs among them. Rabbits come out of the brush.

Another important quote occurs when George talks about the farm he and Lennie dream of buying so that they can escape the life of migrant labor. From the start, the talk of the dream farm has a ritualistic, lulling quality, and it is clear that Lennie knows this story by heart:

"O.K. Someday—we're gonna get the jack together and we're gonna have a little house and a couple of acres an' a cow and some pigs and—"

"An' live off the fatta the lan',"Lennie shouted. "An' have rabbits. Go on, George!"

This story will be repeated throughout the book, acting as a motif that contrasts with the grimness of the ranch life and draws in other ranchers who want to be part of this alternative society.

The quote below establishes that for all his harsh words toward Lennie, his threats of leaving him, and his insistence that having to care for him is burden, George cares about Lennie:

I was jus' foolin', Lennie. 'Cause I want you to stay with me.

Other important quotes establish the appearance of these two main characters. George is "small and quick," while Lennie is "a huge man," likened to a bear. The chapter does important scene-setting and establishes the nature of the relationship between George and Lennie.

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As this question is rather nebulous, consideration will be given to passages that relate to characterization and to foreshadowing since these two literary techniques are prominent in this chapter.

Characterization

George Milton is described as

The first man was small and quick, dark of face, with restless eyes and sharp, strong features.  Every part of him was defined:  small, strong hand, slender arms, a thin and bony nose.

Curiously, George Milton, whose name suggests the brillant 17th century poet who wrote the epic poem Paradise Lost, is a small man, yet the adjective strong is applied to him twice.  His senses are keen and his restless eyes suggest intelligence.  On the other hand, the second man, who follows along dragging his feet as a bear would and described in zoomorphic tones, lunges for the water and immerses himself entirely in the pond as would an animal:

Behind him [George], walked his opposite, a huge man, shapeless of face, with large pale eyes, with wide sloping shoulder; and he walked heavily, dragging his feet a little, the way a bear drags his paws.  His arms did not swing at his sides, but hung loosely. 

Rather than being strong in characterisctics, Lennie drags his feet and lunges for the water,  drinking with "long gulps, snorting into the water like a horse."  It is apparent that George is the brains of the two men, and Lennie the brawn.

Foreshadowing

That problems may arise is suggested by the allusions that George makes to the town Weed, from which George and Lennie suddenly fled; in addition, George bemoans,

"I could get along so easy and so nice if I didn't have you on my tail. I could live so easy and maybe have a girl."

The idyllic scene of the clearing prompts Lennie to ask George to recite their "dream of owning a farm of their own" for him. While he does so, George also cautions Lennie,

"...Well, look, Lennie--if you jus' happen to get in trouble like you always done before, I want you to come right here and ' hide in the brush."

And it is to this Eden-like garden of flora and fauna that Lennie runs at the end of the novella.

Finally, as the men bed down,

The red light dimmed on the coals.  Up the hill from the river a coyote yammered, and a dog answered from the other side of the stream.  The sycamore leaves whispered in a little night breeze.

Certainly, these last lines of Chapter 1 suggest ominous occurrences as the red can symbolize blood and the coyote is a predatory animal. 

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