What are the best achievements of Faustus in necromancy?

Faustus's best achievements in necromancy (conjuring the dead) are calling up Alexander the Great and Helen of Troy, or at least having Mephastophilis do it for him.

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In Christopher Marlowe's play Doctor Faustus , the title character feels that he has obtained as much knowledge as he humanly can—an idea that reveals both his pride and the fact that he still lacks much knowledge—so he turns to supernatural sources searching for even greater “achievements.” Faustus makes...

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In Christopher Marlowe's play Doctor Faustus, the title character feels that he has obtained as much knowledge as he humanly can—an idea that reveals both his pride and the fact that he still lacks much knowledge—so he turns to supernatural sources searching for even greater “achievements.” Faustus makes a deal with the devil that allows him the services of the demon Mephastophilis for twenty-four years in exchange for Faustus's soul.

With the help of Mephastophilis, Faustus becomes especially adept at necromancy, the practice of conjuring up the dead. At the court of Emperor Charles V, for instance, Faustus conjures up Alexander the Great, vastly impressing Charles. As the end of his life draws near, Faustus begins to think twice about what he has done. In an attempt to comfort himself, he has Mephastophilis conjure up Helen of Troy so he can gaze upon her beauty and impress some of his fellow scholars. Faustus also tells the scholars about how he has come to have such abilities, and they are horrified.

Of course, Faustus does not have any abilities on his own. Everything he does is actually due to the power of the demon. Faustus is caught in a trap. He thinks he has all the knowledge and power he could possibly want. He feels superior to other people. But really, Faustus is a slave, and in the end, he loses everything, including his soul.

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