What are some supernatural events in Ecclesiastical History of the English People?

Supernatural events are not the focus of Bede's Ecclesiatical History of the English People, but he does describe miracles as frequent events. These include the body of a Saint being perfectly preserved after eleven years in the tomb, sickness being cured by holy relics, and a man rising from the dead.

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By the standards of his time, the Venerable Bede does not focus much on supernatural events. Nonetheless, his Ecclesiastical History contains some accounts of miracles, which he regards as fairly mundane proofs of the Christian faith, since they happen frequently. In chapter 30, for instance, St. Cuthbert has been dead...

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By the standards of his time, the Venerable Bede does not focus much on supernatural events. Nonetheless, his Ecclesiastical History contains some accounts of miracles, which he regards as fairly mundane proofs of the Christian faith, since they happen frequently. In chapter 30, for instance, St. Cuthbert has been dead for eleven years after performing many miracles during his lifetime. Some monks decide to dig up his body so that more miracles may be attributed to his holy relics:

They did so, and opening the grave, found all the body whole, as if he were still alive, and the joints of the limbs pliable, like one asleep rather than dead; besides, all the vestments in which he was clothed were not only undefiled, but marvelous to behold, being fresh and bright as at the first.

In the following chapter, Brother Badudegn is afflicted with palsy and prays before the body of St. Cuthbert, whereupon he is returned to perfect health, and Bede goes on to note:

Moreover, the very garments which had been on Cuthbert’s body, dedicated to God, either while he was alive, or after his death, were not without the virtue of healing, as may be seen in the book of his life and miracles, by such as shall read it.

Even more impressive is the story of Incuneningum, which is related in chapter 12. This devout man fell sick and died one night, but in the morning, he rose from the dead. The mourners who had been weeping around his body fled in terror—all except his wife, who remained behind and heard him speak. He told her that he was no ghost, but that he had genuinely been restored to life and would have to live in a different manner from this point onwards. He divided his property between his family and the poor and went to become a monk at the Monastery of Mailros.

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