What are some similes in Romeo and Juliet?

One simile in Romeo and Juliet occurs when Romeo describes Juliet as "like a rich jewel in an Ethiop's ear." Romeo also uses a simile to compare love to a thorn: "Is love a tender thing? it is too rough, / Too rude, too boisterous, and it pricks like thorn."

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In act 1, scene 4, Mercutio and Benvolio try to convince Romeo to go with them to the party at the Capulet house. Romeo is still feeling melancholy because the girl he thinks he loves, Rosaline, does not reciprocate his love. He has not yet met Juliet . Mercutio, trying...

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In act 1, scene 4, Mercutio and Benvolio try to convince Romeo to go with them to the party at the Capulet house. Romeo is still feeling melancholy because the girl he thinks he loves, Rosaline, does not reciprocate his love. He has not yet met Juliet. Mercutio, trying to convince Romeo to stop sulking and go to the party, says: "We waste our lights in vain, like lamps by day." This simile suggests that Romeo is wasting his time—and his youth—by obstinately sulking over one girl, when he could be enjoying himself at a party. Wasting his time like this is, Mercutio says, like burning a lamp during the day. In other words, it is futile and unnecessary.

In act 2, scene 3, Juliet worries that the intensity of her first meeting with Romeo might not augur well. She worries that the love they feel for one another might be too intense and too violent. She says that it is "too rash, too unadvised, too sudden; / Too like the lightning." This simile, comparing their love to lightning, suggests that their love will be intense but short lived. This proves of course to be a tragically accurate prediction.

In act 2, scene 6, Friar Laurence echoes Juliet's concerns about the love between her and Romeo when he says that it is "like fire and powder." The "powder" referenced here is gunpowder, and the "fire" is the spark that lights the gunpowder. This simile thus suggests that Romeo and Juliet's love will burn brightly for a short while before ultimately ending in an explosion—that is to say, tragically.

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My favorite simile quote from the play Romeo and Juliet by William Shakespeare is when the author has Romeo compare Juliet to something richly-colored, sparkling, pricelessly valuable and ornamental:

"like a rich jewel in an Ethiop's ear"

The whole image is richly exotic and underlines the glamorous surroundings of the play's setting (when compared to muddy, grey smelly old Shakespearean London!) The Italian city night-time scene is wonderfully evoked by the image Romeo paints in our minds of a warm, scented dark evening, with sweet music, torchlights, dancing and everyone in their prettiest colored clothes. And the central star (for Romeo) is Juliet. We can imagine the size and priceless value of the glittering stone (it must be quite long to hang down from ear to cheek) and can also imagine the softness of Juliet's cheek, as well.

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Simile is used in Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet at the beginning of Act 1.4.

Romeo, Mercutio, Benvolio (of the house of Montague) and others are in the process of entering the house of Capulet to join a party.  The boys, who are "crashing" the party, are joking about whether they should be announced or should just enter without apology.

Benvolio says:

We'll have no Cupid hoodwinked with a scarf [no blind Cupid introducing them--the presenter at events like this would sometimes be dressed as Cupid],

Bearing a Tartar's painted bow of lath [a bow shorter than the traditional English long bow],

Scaring the ladies like a crowkeeper,...

Crowkeeper is simply a scarecrow.  Thus, Benvolio says that the boys will not be introduced at the party by a presenter dressed like Cupid, carrying a small bow, who will scare the ladies like a scarecrow scares crows.  That is a simile. 

The presenter scaring the ladies is compared by the use of the word, like, to a scarecrow scaring crows. 

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One of my favorite similes in Romeo and Juliet occurs in the balcony scene (act II, scene ii):

ROMEO:
A thousand times the worse, to want thy light.
Love goes toward love, as schoolboys from
their books,

But love from love, toward school with heavy looks.

The comparison occurring here states that two people in love are drawn to each other as strongly as school children are drawn away from their studies. This is said as the two are saying their goodbyes and begin to make plans for their next meeting. It is saying that their desire to return to each other is be powerful, at least according to Romeo.

What makes this a simile is the comparison between the longing for love, and the lack of longing for school. It also uses the word "as."

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As I am sure that you know, a simile is when someone compares one thing to another and does so directly.  So it is like when someone says "my love is like a red, red, rose."  They are comparing their love to a rose and they are clearly doing so, using the word "like."

Romeo uses a simile in Act I, Scene 4 when he is talking to Mercutio.  He compares love to a thorn.  He says

Is love a tender thing? it is too rough,
Too rude, too boisterous, and it pricks like thorn.

Then, when he sees Juliet at the feast at her house, Romeo starts to talk about how beautiful she is.  He uses another simile.

It seems she hangs upon the cheek of night
Like a rich jewel in an Ethiope's ear

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In Act II, scene 2 (the famous balcony scene in Romeo and Juliet), there are several similes. For example, Romeo says, "bright angel! for thou art/As glorious to this night, being o’er my head/As is a winged messenger of heaven/Unto the white-upturned wondering eyes/ Of mortals that fall back to gaze on him" (lines 26-30). In other words, Romeo compares Juliet, who is standing on her balcony above him, to an angel who people fall backwards to gaze at in the heavens. Later in the scene, Romeo says, "Yet, wert thou as far/ As that vast shore washed with the farthest sea,/ I would adventure for such merchandise" (lines 82-84). Here, Romeo says that were Juliet as far away as the farther shore, he would still try to reach her. 

Later, in Act IV, scene 3, Juliet uses similes when she speaks about her fear of being closed in a tomb to fake death. She describes the yells she might hear while in the tomb as, "shrieks like mandrakes torn out of the earth" (line 48). In this line, she is comparing the screams of the dead to the supposed screams of a root called a mandrake, which, according to legend, was supposed to yell when it was torn from the earth.

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