Animal Farm Questions and Answers
by George Orwell

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What are some rhetorical devices that are used in chapter 3 of Animal Farm? Why are these significant?  

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David Morrison eNotes educator | Certified Educator

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Squealer resorts to pathos, a rhetorical device used to arouse the audience's emotions. To an outside observer, it might seem that Snowball and the pigs are cruelly exploiting the other animals: the pigs get to lord it over them while they, the other animals, are busy doing all the work. But this is not so, says Squealer. On the contrary, since he drove Snowball from the farm, Napoleon has been working harder than ever for the welfare of the animals. Now that Snowball's gone, he argues that Napoleon has had to take on the burden of extra work:

"Comrades," he said, "I trust that every animal here appreciates the sacrifice that Comrade Napoleon has made in taking this extra labour upon himself. Do not imagine, comrades, that leadership is a pleasure!"

Squealer's expert use of pathos makes it seem that it's Napoleon—not the humble farm animals—who is making all the sacrifices; Napoleon's the one who's working tirelessly...

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