What are some quotes related to Romanticism that can be found in "Rappaccini’s Daughter" by Nathaniel Hawthorne?  

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Nathaniel Hawthorne's short story "Rappaccini's Daughter" is a work of romanticism because it covers themes such as individualism, appreciation for nature, the complexity of human emotion, and the concepts of good and evil.

The story suggests that the individual is much more relevant than society. Rappaccini is a...

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Nathaniel Hawthorne's short story "Rappaccini's Daughter" is a work of romanticism because it covers themes such as individualism, appreciation for nature, the complexity of human emotion, and the concepts of good and evil.

The story suggests that the individual is much more relevant than society. Rappaccini is a scientist who traps his own daughter in a garden filled with poisonous plants in order to conduct an experiment, which makes his daughter poisonous as well. He's presented as selfish and self-obsessed. His love for science is much bigger than his love for humanity and for his daughter. He's prepared to "sacrifice human life" in order to gain new scientific knowledge. In the words of his rival, Baglioni, Rappaccini

cares infinitely more for science than for mankind. His patients are interesting to him only as subjects for some new experiment. He would sacrifice human life, his own among the rest, or whatever else was dearest to him, for the sake of adding so much as a grain of mustard-seed to the great heap of his accumulated knowledge.

Hawthorne describes the garden in which Beatrice is trapped in great detail, showing his appreciation of nature in true romantic fashion. From the very beginning of the story, through Giovanni's observations from his window, the readers are introduced to beautiful flowers, captivating smells and lavish fountains:

All about the pool into which the water subsided, grew various plants, that seemed to require a plentiful supply of moisture for the nourishment of gigantic leaves, and, in some instances, flowers gorgeously magnificent. There was one shrub in particular, set in a marble vase in the midst of the pool, that bore a profusion of purple blossoms, each of which had the lustre and richness of a gem; and the whole together made a show so resplendent that it seemed enough to illuminate the garden, even had there been no sunshine. Every portion of the soil was peopled with plants and herbs, which, if less beautiful, still bore tokens of assiduous care; as if all had their individual virtues, known to the scientific mind that fostered them. Some were placed in urns, rich with old carving, and others in common garden-pots; some crept serpent-like along the ground, or climbed on high, using whatever means of ascent was offered them. One plant had wreathed itself round a statue of Vertumnus, which was thus quite veiled and shrouded in a drapery of hanging foliage, so happily arranged that it might have served a sculptor for a study.

Such detailed descriptions of nature, symbols and imagery are present throughout the entire narrative; however, Hawthorne makes use of various Gothic elements as well. For example, the more Giovanni looks at the garden, the more he realizes that the garden's beauty is actually dark and grotesque. It attracts the observer with colors and smells, only to reveal its darkness, mystery, and even ugliness soon after.

The aspect of one and all of them dissatisfied him; their gorgeousness seemed fierce, passionate, and even unnatural. There was hardly an individual shrub which a wanderer, straying by himself through a forest, would not have been startled to find growing wild, as if an unearthly face had glared at him out of the thicket. Several also would have shocked a delicate instinct by an appearance of artificialness indicating that there had been such commixture, and, as it were, adultery, of various vegetable species, that the production was no longer of God's making, but the monstrous offspring of man's depraved fancy, glowing with only an evil mockery of beauty.

Interestingly enough, Giovanni sees Beatrice the same way he sees the garden—beautiful and attractive, but at the same time, "poisonous" and "inexpressibly terrible." He admires her beauty and innocence, but he also sees her as a "hateful, ugly, loathsome and deadly creature—a world's wonder of hideous monstrosity!"

This juxtaposition between the beautiful and the grotesque is also a characteristic of dark romanticism. Giovanni convinces himself that Beatrice is somehow "evil" and that he must help her become "good." He offers her an herbal "medicine" that will cure her and "purify them both from evil," which ends up killing her. Beatrice, therefore, is not only a victim of the selfishness of the people around her, but also of Giovanni's inability to accept the coexistence of good and evil, both in nature and in humans.

To Beatrice—so radically had her earthly part been wrought upon by Rappaccini's skill—as poison had been life, so the powerful antidote was death. And thus the poor victim of man's ingenuity and of thwarted nature, and of the fatality that attends all such efforts of perverted wisdom, perished there, at the feet of her father and Giovanni.

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