What are some quotes Crooks says about dreams in Of Mice and Men?  

Most of what Crooks says about dreams rejects them as unrealistic. For example, he states that "Nobody never gets to heaven, and nobody gets no land. It's just in their head."

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Crooks at first repudiates Lennie's idea that he and George are going to buy a farm and live off the fat of the land. He calls the dream a fantasy, stating,

Nobody never gets to heaven, and nobody gets no land. It's just in their head.

When Candy supports Lennie and says they are putting together a "stake," Crooks is still scornful about such dreams:

You'll talk about it a hell of a lot, but you won't get no land. You'll be a swamper here till they take you out in a box

As Candy becomes more persuasive, Crooks begins to be swayed and wants in on the plan in a modest way, knowing his race is a handicap:

If you ... guys would want a hand to work for nothing—just his keep, why I'd come an' lend a hand.

After Curley's wife humiliates him, however, Crooks rejects the dream and says he was only "foolin'" about wanting to be a part of it.

Life has taught Crooks harsh lessons, and he has learned to be a harsh realist. We find out through him that the dream of independence through owning a small farm is a common one among the migrant workers but also an impossible dream for people in their situation.

Through watching his reaction, especially when, for a moment, he is carried away by the fantasy, we understand that he rejects all dreaming because it is too heartbreaking to be constantly disappointed. It's better for him to accept a lonely reality that to hope for anything better. Yet the fact that he loses his head for a moment also shows how badly he would love to have a more dignified life than working on the ranch.

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In chapter 4, Candy arrives in the doorway of Crooks's private room while Lennie is inside and begins discussing their dream of purchasing their own homestead, where they will live off the land and Lennie can tend rabbits. Crooks interrupts their discussion and proceeds to elaborate on the impossibility of their dream. Crooks tells Candy and Lennie,

"I seen hunderds of men come by on the road an’ on the ranches, with their bindles on their back an’ that same damn thing in their heads. Hunderds of them. They come, an’ they quit an’ go on; an’ every damn one of ‘em’s got a little piece of land in his head. An’ never a God damn one of ‘em ever gets it. Just like heaven. Ever’body wants a little piece of lan’. I read plenty of books out here. Nobody never gets to heaven, and nobody gets no land. It’s just in their head. They’re all the time talkin’ about it, but it’s jus’ in their head" (Steinbeck, 36).

Crooks has been on the ranch for some time and has never witnessed a laborer save up enough money to purchase their own piece of property. Crooks displays his pessimistic attitude by telling Candy,

"You guys is just kiddin’ yourself. You’ll talk about it a hell of a lot, but you won’t get no land. You’ll be a swamper here till they take you out in a box. Hell, I seen too many guys. Lennie here’ll quit an’ be on the road in two, three weeks. Seems like ever’ guy got land in his head" (Steinbeck, 37).

Candy responds to Crooks's negative comments by saying that they've already saved up enough money and George knows where there is a plot of land for sale at a reasonable price. Crooks is taken back by this information and briefly entertains the possibility of attaining the seemingly impossible dream. Crooks even contemplates the possibility of joining the men and partaking in their dream by saying,

"I never seen a guy really do it . . . I seen guys nearly crazy with loneliness for land, but ever’ time a whore house or a blackjack game took what it takes.” He hesitated . . . . "If you . . . guys would want a hand to work for nothing—just his keep, why I’d come an’ lend a hand. I ain’t so crippled I can’t work like a son-of-a-bitch if I want to" (Steinbeck, 37).

Overall, Crooks initially thinks that Candy, George, and Lennie's dream is impossible to attain. His experience on the farm has taught him that nobody can ever save up enough money or formulate a plan to attain their dreams. However, Crooks eventually entertains the possibility of sharing their dream and even offers to lend a hand on their homestead. In the end, Crooks's initial assessment of their dreams proves correct after Lennie kills Curley's wife and ruins their plans.

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Crooks has a very hopeless outlook about dreams.  Isolated by his color and his disabilities, he has little to look forward to and is lonely and bitter.  About dreams, Crooks says,

"I seen hunderds of men come by on the road an' on the ranches, with their bindles on their back an'...every damn one of 'em's got a little piece of land in his head.  An' never a God damn one of 'em ever gets it.  Just like heaven.  Ever'body wants a little piece of lan'...Nobody never gets to heaven, and nobody gets no land.  They're all the time talkin' about it, but it's jus' in their head".

Crooks thinks Lenny and George are foolish to dream that they will have a little piece of land to call home one day.  He reiterates,

"You guys is just kiddin' yourself.  You'll talk about it a hell of a lot, but you won't get no land".

Crooks believes that men do not have the character to make their dreams come true.  He says,

"I never seen a guy really do it...I seen guys nearly crazy with loneliness for land, but ever' time a whore house or a blackjack game took what it takes".

After listening to Lennie talk at length about the dream he and George share, Crooks drops his guard for a little while and allows himself to dream of joining them.  He soon reneges, however, scoffing,

"jus' forget it...I didn' mean it.  Jus' foolin'.  I wouldn' want to go no place like that" (Chapter 4).

 

 

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