What are some quotes and citations that describe the barn, bunkhouse, and Crooks' room in Of Mice and Men?

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In chapter two, John Steinbeck describes the bunk house at the ranch at the point when George and Lennie are hired. In one substantial paragraph, the author includes information on the shape of the long building, the color of the walls, the windows and doors, and the eight bunks. Steinbeck’s...

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In chapter two, John Steinbeck describes the bunk house at the ranch at the point when George and Lennie are hired. In one substantial paragraph, the author includes information on the shape of the long building, the color of the walls, the windows and doors, and the eight bunks. Steinbeck’s narrator emphasizes the uniformity of the space as well as the lack of privacy and contrasts these elements to each man’s preferences by listing the kinds of personal items that each man keeps on a shelf above the bunk.

The bunk house was a long, rectangular building. Inside, the walls were whitewashed and the floor unpainted. In three walls there were small, square windows, and in the fourth, a solid door with a wooden latch. Against the wails were eight bunks, five of them made up with blankets and the other three showing their burlap ticking.

The description also includes the heat source, which is a stove, and the presence of a table that the men use for playing cards. The austerity of the furnishings are emphasized by stating that instead of chairs, the seats consist of boxes.

Near one wall there was a black cast-iron stove, its stovepipe going straight up through the ceiling. In the middle of the room stood a big square table littered with playing cards, and around it were grouped boxes for the players to sit on.

In contrast, Crooks has his own room, but it is on the side of the barn. Because he is black, the ranch owners do not allow him to bunk with the other men. In chapter four, Steinbeck describes Crooks’s room. Contrasted to the harshness of this segregation is his greater privacy and that he can be less tidy with his possessions.

Crooks, the Negro stable buck, had his bunk in the harness room; a little shed that leaned off the wall of the barn. On one side of the little room there was a square four-paned window, and on the other, a narrow plank door leading into the barn. Crooks' bunk was a long box filled with straw, on which his blankets were flung.

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Of Mice and Men is structurally similar to a play.  Each of the chapters begins with a detailed description of the setting, and the characters move within the chapter restricted by this setting.  Characters come into and go out of the space; the characters who remain hear sounds from without; but the visual scenery does not change once the setting is established.

With that said, you can find descriptions of the bunkhouse, Crooks's room, and the barn respectively at the beginnings of Chapters 2, 4, and 5.  I'm not sure based on your question the purpose of finding these descriptions, but you can look specifically for ways that Steinbeck uses light/dark imagery, especially in the barn where the sun is descending and creating a progressively darker atmosphere, mirroring the progressively more horrifying events that occur.  The items that are found in the bunkhouse and in Crooks's room can be compared and analyzed for characterization purposes.  The men in the bunkhouse focus on fleshly concerns and shallow pleasures, while Crooks is more concerned with mental pursuits.

Hope this helps.

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