What are some quotes about the relationship between George and Lennie in Of Mice and Men?

Quotes about the relationship between George and Lennie include the “hoot in hell” quote, the “I wouldn’t eat no ketchup” quote, and the “Le’s get that place now” quote. The first quote shows how Lennie and George care about each other. The second quote demonstrates how Lennie and George could be like a parent and a child. The third quote reveals the fatal end to their bond.

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There's plenty of quotes that emphasize Lennie and George's unique, conflicting relationship. I can help you identify and talk about some of them.

Guys like us got no fambly. They make a little stake an' then they blow it in. They ain't got nobody in the worl' that gives...

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There's plenty of quotes that emphasize Lennie and George's unique, conflicting relationship. I can help you identify and talk about some of them.

Guys like us got no fambly. They make a little stake an' then they blow it in. They ain't got nobody in the worl' that gives a hoot in hell about 'em —

Those are George’s words. They come near the end of the novel, prompted by Lennie. Lennie interrupts George with, “But not us.” The quote shows the deep connection between the two. It also shows how their connection contrasts with other people in their predicament. Other people are lonely and alienated. They don’t have meaningful relationships. Yet George and Lennie mean something to one another. They do give “a hoot in hell” about each other’s welfare.

Le’s do it now. Le’s get that place now.

This time, it’s Lennie who’s speaking. He’s asking George to, once again, remind him of the land they’ll buy and all of the animals that they’ll care for on that land. You could argue that the quote highlights the rather contrary nature of this moment in their relationship. George does really care about Lennie, but he is also about to Kill Lennie. Before he kills him, he acts as if it won’t be long before their dream of owning land comes true. George is tricking Lennie, but it seems to be for a kind reason. He seems to be lulling Lennie into a comfortable mindset so that he won't die scared but instead die happy. If George didn’t kill Lennie, he will likely be killed far more cruelly by Curley. You might say George’s deep concern for Lennie is what leads him to take his life.

I was only foolin’, George. I don’t want no ketchup. I wouldn’t eat no ketchup if it was right here beside me.

This, too, is Lennie. It comes at the start of the book. As you might remember, the book begins with Lennie aching from some ketchup to go along with his beans. George is quite annoyed and yells at Lennie about the ketchup (and some other issues). After that, Lennie walks back his demand for ketchup. You could argue this quote shows the power dynamic of their relationship. Lennie doesn’t want to bother George. He wants to please George and be agreeable to him. It’s almost as if Lennie is like a child and George is like a parent. George is the one with the power. He's the grownup.

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Lennie, for God’s sakes don’t drink so much. . . . You gonna be sick like you was last night.

In the quote above, very early in the novel, George shows his caretaking role in Lennie's life. Even when it comes to something as simple as drinking water, Lennie depends on George to help him show restraint.

Look, Lennie! This here ain’t no setup. I’m scared. You gonna have trouble with that Curley guy. I seen that kind before.

Curley is small and wants to demonstrate his manhood against the much larger Lennie. George reveals his honesty in telling Lennie he is scared, showing they have a close relationship and that George doesn't have to fear that Lennie will think less of him for revealing vulnerability. This is a striking contrast to the way he verbally spars with Curley and won't give ground. George again exhibits his caretaking ability in this quote in warning Lennie to steer clear of Curley, who is the ranch owner's son as well as a difficult personality.

What you supposin’ for? Ain’t nobody goin’ to suppose no hurt to George.

Lennie says this in a threatening way to Crooks. Crooks has just teased him, a bit cruelly, about the possibility that the absent George is injured or in trouble. Lennie shows he is equally protective toward George as George is toward him, though Lennie presents this in a more physical way. The large, strong Lennie is more than willing to fight anyone he feels threatens his closest friend.

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George is responsible for Lennie, and sometimes the difficulties of his responsibilites frustrate him.  He complains to Lennie,

"An' whatta I got...I got you!  You can't keep a job and you lose me ever' job I get.  Jus' keep me shovin' all over the country all the time.  An' that ain't the worst.  You get in trouble.  You do bad things and I got to get you out...you keep me in hot water all the time".

Despite the frustrations of taking care of Lennie, however, George appreciates that the two of them have a special bond which keeps them from being lonely.  He says,

"Guys like us, that work on ranches, are the loneliest guys in the world.  They got no family.  They don't belong no place...with us it ain't like that...we got somebody to talk to that gives a damn about us...if them other guys gets in jail they can rot for all anybody gives a damn.  But not us...An' why?  Because I got you to look after me, and you got me to look after you, and that's why".

George and Lennie share a dream.  When things are tough, they hopefully remind themselves,

"Someday - we're gonna get the jack together and we're gonna have a little house and a couple of acres an' a cow and some pigs and...a big vegetable patch and a rabbit hutch and chickens".

And best of all, if Lennie is good, George promises,

"I can let you tend the rabbits" (Chapter 1).

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