What are some of Faber's positive and negative traits in Fahrenheit 451?

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In Fahrenheit 451, Faber is a retired English professor that Guy Montag turns to for help, and like everyone, Faber has good points and bad points.

Faber is a wise man, and he offers Montag new perspectives, especially about books. Montag has always been taught that books are silly...

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In Fahrenheit 451, Faber is a retired English professor that Guy Montag turns to for help, and like everyone, Faber has good points and bad points.

Faber is a wise man, and he offers Montag new perspectives, especially about books. Montag has always been taught that books are silly and useless at best and often even dangerous. But Faber shows him the wonders of books and literature. Books are challenging. They make people face truth. They force people to think. They present new and often disturbing ideas. They will not allow people to be lazy in their minds. They present people with a magic beyond anything the “parlor walls” can even come close to. Faber explains all of this as well as how the powers that be want people unthinking and controllable. That's why they have to get rid of the books. Faber's words make Montag think in new ways, and this is certainly worthy of respect.

Faber and Montag develop a plan to bring down the system, and it seems like it might just work. Faber has even developed a brilliant communications device to keep him connected with Montag. But then Faber gets cold feet. He tells Montag that their idea is just fantasy, and he descends toward despair when he explains that they really can't help anything, for people actually chose to stop reading out of laziness. Sometimes, too, Faber can be on the cowardly side, as he himself admits. He helps Montag escape toward the end of the novel, but he does not flee with him. Rather he goes to St. Louis in hopes of writing a new book. Perhaps he is not as much a coward as a man who knows his limits and abides by them.

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