What are some metaphors in the poem "I Wandered Lonely As A Cloud"?

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When the speaker in Wordsworth's 1807 poem chances upon a vast array of daffodils along a lake, he describes them as a "never-ending line." He is speaking metaphorically, since their number would of course be finite.

The poet makes frequent use of personification, a type of metaphor . He...

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When the speaker in Wordsworth's 1807 poem chances upon a vast array of daffodils along a lake, he describes them as a "never-ending line." He is speaking metaphorically, since their number would of course be finite.

The poet makes frequent use of personification, a type of metaphor. He observes the daffodils "fluttering and dancing" and "tossing their heads in sprightly dance." The waves dance as well, but the speaker attributes the daffodils as feeling "glee" because they are outshining the waves. Moreover, the daffodils offer him "jocund company," or cheerful, happy companionship, like that of other people or perhaps a pet.

Later, after he has left the scene that has brought him so much joy, the speaker reflects that when he was in the moment of enjoying the sight, he could not have known "what wealth the show to me" would offer him in the future. Wordsworth uses the metaphor of "an inward eye" to describe a memory vivid with imagery. He uses the word "wealth" metaphorically to emphasize how transformational the sight has been to the speaker, instead of the way the word "wealth" is literally used to denote tangible riches.

In the final stanza, the speaker's heart is metaphorically filled when he reimagines in his mind what the scene looked like. And again, metaphorically, his heart "dances with the daffodils."

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One extended metaphor in Wordsworth’s “I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud” is in the comparison of nature to something materially valuable. In making this comparison, Wordsworth supports the idea that nature is a treasured resource that is always there for us.

The speaker describes wandering through nature and coming upon a field of daffodils, which appear to be dancing in the breeze. This image of the dancing flowers is beautiful, and the speaker stops to admire it. In this metaphor, he calls the flowers “golden,” which brings up an idea of importance. Gold is a valuable resource that people seem to want in great quantities. Therefore, equating the yellow daffodils with gold gives them a great value.

Wordsworth continues the metaphor as the speaker compares the flowers to the “stars that shine / And twinkle.” These lines call to mind a valuable gem, one that sparkles and shines, suggesting its great worth. Wordsworth is commenting on nature’s great value, as the speaker explicitly states it was only later that he realized “What wealth the show to me had brought.” Nature is to be valued as much as, if not more than, any sparkly gem. Here, nature brings happiness and peace to the speaker, who was previously feeling quite lonely.

The last stanza ends the metaphor, as the speaker reminisces about that day he discovered the daffodils. Whenever he feels sad, the image of the dancing flowers flashes through his mind, and his heart “dances” with them. He feels “bliss” now because he has the comfort of great wealth—“Ten thousand” daffodils are there for him whenever he needs them.

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In the final stanza, Wordsworth refers to the memory of the daffodils flashing "upon that inward eye." Neither Wordsworth nor any other human being actually has some part of his body that can be identified as an inward eye; he's speaking metaphorically.

What he means is that the daffodils have had such a powerful effect upon him that he can see them just as clearly now as when he first encountered them on that fateful day when he wandered lonely as a cloud. They do not simply appear to his inward eye, which could well be a metaphor for the soul; they flash upon it, in much the same way as a flash of lightning illuminates everything on an otherwise dark and gloomy day.

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A metaphor is a comparison that does not use the words "like" or "as." A metaphor that Wordsworth uses throughout "I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud" is that of dancing.

Wordsworth describes the thousands of daffodils he sees massed in front of a lake one spring day as "dancing in the breeze." Of course, they are not literally doing a dance, but the way the breeze blows them makes them look as if they are engaged in a lively, choreographed dance. We can picture the daffodils all at once bending one way and then another in the breeze.

Liking the metaphor of the daffodils dancing, Wordsworth later describes them as

Tossing their heads in sprightly dance.

Of course, they are not literally tossing their heads or dancing, but the poet uses the dance metaphor to personify, or humanize, them, causing us to see the daffodils as people.

The poet next states that the water is dancing, but not in such a lively and arresting way as the daffodils:

the waves beside them danced but they /Out-did the sparkling waves in glee.

Finally, in the last line of the poem, the poet extends the dance metaphor to his own heart, saying his heart dances when it remembers the daffodils. Of course, the narrator's heart is not literally dancing, but the metaphor expresses the joy the memory of the flowers brings to him.

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