Romeo and Juliet Questions and Answers
by William Shakespeare

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What are some literary devices in act III, scenes 4–5 in Romeo and Juliet by William Shakespeare?

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Romeo and Juliet act 3, scene 4, is a brief scene and contains little in the way of literary devices. Paris says:

These times of woe afford no time to woo.

“Woe” and “woo” are here juxtaposed in a rather surprising pun, given the circumstances. Aside from this, Capulet, in his excitement, asks a couple of rhetorical questions:

Will you be ready? do you like this haste?

This is about all the literary devices, apart from some mild alliteration. Act 3, scene 5, however, has a great many literary devices. There is symbolism in the references to the nightingale and the lark, which represent night and day. Metaphor, followed by personification, then occurs in the lines:

Night's candles are burnt out, and jocund day
Stands tiptoe on the misty mountain tops.

The dreamy mood here is shattered by the stark juxtaposition of opposites in Romeo's following line:

I must be gone and live, or stay and die.

There is further personification of both morning and moon in Romeo’s lines:

I'll say yon grey is not the...

(The entire section contains 3 answers and 1,231 words.)

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