What are some lessons that Ponyboy learns throughout The Outsiders and how do they impact his personality?

Ponyboy learns from talking with Cherry that there are many similarities between people despite their differences. He recognizes that Dally has deep feelings despite his tough-guy exterior. He also realizes that his family shares a stronger bond than he had ever realized. These lessons impact his personality by making him more introspective, as he decides to write about his friends, their story and all that he has learned.

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Some lessons that Ponyboy learns throughout the novel are that there are many similarities between people despite their differences, that one does not always know what a person truly feels deep down inside, and that his family shares a stronger bond than he had realized earlier. They impact his personality...

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Some lessons that Ponyboy learns throughout the novel are that there are many similarities between people despite their differences, that one does not always know what a person truly feels deep down inside, and that his family shares a stronger bond than he had realized earlier. They impact his personality by making him more introspective, as he decides to put pen to paper and write about his friends, their story, and all that he has learned over the course of the book.

One of the most important things Ponyboy learns is that people are essentially the same deep down, despite economic differences. For instance, when he and Cherry sit together and look at the moon, he realizes that there are many similarities between them. They both look at the same moon, generally from different houses. Although their houses are in very different parts of town and their economic circumstances are different, the moon is the same for both of them.

He also recognizes that there is something deeper than a surface greaser demeanor about many of his friends. Dally puts himself at risk to save Johnny and Ponyboy when the fire breaks out, despite his hard exterior and violent tendencies. Moreover, after Johnny dies, Dally is so distraught that he dies too, which belies his tough guy exterior character.

Ponyboy also learns that Darry loves him. Ponyboy knows that Sodapop loves him, but all along he has believed that his oldest brother Darry resented him because to keep the family together, Darry must drop out of school and get a job to support them. When Ponyboy gets hurt, Darry tells him that he loves him and worries about him.

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Ponyboy Curtis learns a great deal throughout the novel. First, Ponyboy learns that even though people come from different places and share different experiences, we all have a great deal in common. In chapter 3, he states,

"It seemed funny that the sunset [Cherry] saw from her patio and the one I saw from the back steps was the same one. Maybe the two worlds we lived in weren't so different. We saw the same sunset."

This quote shows us that Ponyboy has learned that even though the Socs have nice cars and wealthy parents, they and the Greasers (and all people) share traits and qualities that make us similar in one way or another. This realization impacts Ponyboy because it makes him more accepting of the Socs later in the book, especially in regards to the character of Randy.

Likewise, reading the novel Gone with the Wind and the poem "Nothing Gold Can Stay" at the abandoned church teaches Ponyboy that all happiness, youth, and even life eventually comes to an end. In the novel Gone with the Wind, the Confederate soldiers ride into battle in a heroic charge only to meet their demise. Likewise, in "Nothing Gold Can Stay," Robert Frost (the author) makes it clear that all of nature's greatest gifts and most beautiful characteristics eventually fade away. Both of these works of literature impact Ponyboy's personality and give him a better perspective on the deaths of Johnny and Dally. Because of these pieces of literature, he is more equipped to deal with the loss of his friends—a loss which might cause others to make dramatic and terrible decisions.

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One important lesson that Ponyboy learns is that even the most hardened of characters can care about others. Early in the story, Ponyboy describes Dallas Winston's eyes as being "cold with a hatred of the whole world." When compared to the other Greasers, Ponyboy says that Dallas is "tougher, colder, meaner." However, throughout the story, it becomes apparent that Dallas cares deeply about Johnny. Dallas is the first one that Ponyboy and Johnny go to when they get in trouble. When Johnny dies as a result of his injuries, it is clear that Dallas experiences grief. His way of dealing with that grief is to get himself killed.

For a young kid, Ponyboy has more than his share of difficult and trying times. He suffers the loss of his parents and the loss of friends. However, through these times, Ponyboy learns that his brothers and his friends love and care about him. Most importantly, through reading the letter from Johnny, he learns that he can impact others. Johnny encourages him to tell others about the parts of life that are beautiful. For example, Johnny mentions Ponyboy's love of sunsets and how Ponyboy should share this love with others.

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Ponyboy learns several important lessons throughout the novel. He learns that Socs also have issues despite their affluent backgrounds and that he shares similar interests with some of them. Through his conversations and interactions with Cherry and Randy, Ponyboy realizes that some members of the Socs are sensitive, sympathetic individuals who are also sick of the ongoing violence. Ponyboy becomes increasingly tolerant following his interactions with Cherry and Randy. Ponyboy also learns to appreciate Darry and Dally. Initially, Ponyboy views Dally with contempt and is continually arguing with his brother. After surviving a life-threatening experience, Dally helps Pony and Johnny run away and also saves Johnny's life while the church is on fire. After thinking about Dally's actions, Pony realizes for the first time that Dally is "gallant" and selfless for helping him and Johnny out in times of need. At the end of the novel, Ponyboy finally recognizes the sacrifices Darry has made to keep the family together. He ends up appreciating Darry for giving up an athletic scholarship and working two jobs in order to provide for the family. Overall, Pony's experiences increase his perspective which allows him to become more tolerant and appreciative of others.

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