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What are some features of literature in the post-Elizabethan era?

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The Elizabethan era was followed by what is commonly known in British and Scottish history as the Jacobean era, which began in 1603 and ended in 1625. During this time, England was under the command of James VI of Scotland, who was crowned as King James I. In fact, according...

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The Elizabethan era was followed by what is commonly known in British and Scottish history as the Jacobean era, which began in 1603 and ended in 1625. During this time, England was under the command of James VI of Scotland, who was crowned as King James I. In fact, according to many literary analysts, the King James version of the Bible, which was translated in English and published in 1611, is one of the most notable literary works of the Jacobean era; the translation was widely accepted, and it was actually acknowledged as the official English Bible until the early twentieth century.

Post-Elizabethan literature is often described as dark, pragmatic, philosophical, somewhat cynical, witty, and sometimes even pessimistic, as the writers who wrote in this time period wanted to explore and rationalize the meaning of many different social, political and cultural notions. One of the most prominent writers of this era was the famed William Shakespeare, who wrote King Lear in 1605 and Macbeth in 1606—two of his darkest and most popular plays. Other popular writers include John Webster, Francis Bacon, Thomas Middleton, Francis Beaumont, Thomas Hobbes, John Milton, and others.

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