What are some fate quotes in Romeo and Juliet?

There are several quotes in Romeo and Juliet which indicate that Romeo and Juliet's love affair is fated to end tragically. Throughout the play, Shakespeare implies that the deaths of the two titular characters are, as it were, written in the stars.

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Fate is an essential element in Romeo and Juliet. The audience is continually reminded that, whatever action they may take, the two lovers are fated to die. Their death is first foreshadowed in the prologue:

From forth the fatal loins of these two foes
A pair of star-cross'd lovers take their life;
Whose misadventured piteous overthrows
Do with their death bury their parents' strife.

Romeo and Juliet are born, dead, and buried within the space of four lines. Both are at least periodically aware of what fate has in store for them. Before he first encounters Juliet, when Benvolio tells him that they will be late for the Capulets' ball, Romeo replies:

I fear, too early: for my mind misgives
Some consequence yet hanging in the stars
Shall bitterly begin his fearful date
With this night's revels and expire the term
Of a despised life closed in my breast
By some vile forfeit of untimely death.

Even when they are together, Juliet has a similar—though less specific—premonition of disaster when she says,

I have no joy of this contract to-night:
It is too rash, too unadvised, too sudden;
Too like the lightning, which doth cease to be
Ere one can say "It lightens."

Later, the last time they see each other alive, Juliet's fears are both more precise and more frightening. Her final words to Romeo before he leaves for Mantua are

O God, I have an ill-divining soul!
Methinks I see thee, now thou art so low,
As one dead in the bottom of a tomb:
Either my eyesight fails, or thou look'st pale.

Romeo has already declared himself to be "fortune's fool" after killing Tybalt. When he hears of the death of Juliet, he understands that fate is against him and cries out:

Is it even so? then I defy you, stars!

When he arrives at Juliet's tomb and finds Paris there, Romeo kills his rival before discovering his identity. When he does see Paris's face, he feels no animosity, but instead feels a sense of kinship since he sees that they have both been the playthings of fate:

One writ with me in sour misfortune's book!
I'll bury thee in a triumphant grave

When Friar Laurence arrives on the scene and sees both Romeo and Paris dead, he comes to the same conclusion and tries to persuade Juliet to come away with him:

A greater power than we can contradict
Hath thwarted our intents.

This attempt, however, is useless, as it was fated to be.

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In act 3, scene 1, Romeo reacts to the death of his friend Mercutio by exclaiming, "This day's black fate on more days doth depend." The "black fate" here is a reference to Mercutio's death, and the implication is that this death was fated. Romeo also suggests that the death of Mercutio shall determine the future, or the "more days" to come. The idea about fate that these lines suggest is that fate is a series of interconnected events, whereby one event leads on inevitably to the next. Romeo is indeed correct about this, as Mercutio's death is one event in the series of events which ultimately leads to the deaths of Romeo and Juliet.

A little later in act 3, scene 1, after Romeo has killed Tybalt, Romeo proclaims, "O, I am fortune's fool!" The implication here is that fate, or fortune, is toying with Romeo, or making fun of him. Romeo realizes that he will be banished—or worse, put to death—for what he has done, and he blames fate rather than himself for this outcome.

In act 3, scene 5, as Romeo is climbing down from Juliet's bedroom, Juliet has a vision. She imagines, as she looks down at Romeo, that he is dead at "the bottom of the tomb." She describes this as an "ill-divining" vision, meaning that she is afraid that this vision foreshadows a tragic fate for Romeo. As Romeo exits the stage, Juliet then exclaims, "O fortune, fortune!...Be fickle, fortune...I hope, thou wilt not keep him long, / But send him back." Here Juliet is imploring fate to bring Romeo back to her soon. She hopes that fate will be "fickle," meaning that she hopes fate will return Romeo to her as quickly, and as unexpectedly, as it took him away from her. In this passage, fate is again portrayed as a cruel, mischievous, and omnipotent tyrant.

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As early as the play's Prologue, we learn that fate will play a significant role in the events which are about to take place. The Chorus says,

From forth the fatal loins of these two foes
A pair of star-crossed lovers take their life [...]. (lines 5-6)

Here, to be star-crossed means that the love between Romeo and Juliet is doomed from the start, frustrated by the stars which run counter to their desires and are linked to their joined destiny, and so we know that their downfalls are already fated: they will take their own lives as a result of their ill-fated love. Moreover, the Chorus calls Romeo and Juliet's relationship a "death-marked love," again drawing attention to the fact that their individual fates have already been decided: they will both die tragically, and their love will die with them (line 9).

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The most obvious fate quote is the opening prologue.  It summarizes most of the play in its 14 lines.  That's probably cheating though.  

Romeo, on his way over to the Capulet ball, tells the reader that he has some misgivings about events that will be set in motion that night. 

"I fear, too early: for my mind misgives
Some consequence yet hanging in the stars
Shall bitterly begin his fearful date
With this night's revels and expire the term
Of a despised life closed in my breast
By some vile forfeit of untimely death."

At the ball, just before Romeo and Juliet meet, Juliet asks her nurse to find out who that guy (Romeo) is.  She makes a prediction then that links her wedding and her grave. 

"Go ask his name: if he be married,
My grave is like to be my wedding bed."

Mercutio screams out the following: "A plague a’ both houses!" Yep, he's right.  There is a plague on both houses.  There has been, and it will get worse before the play is over.  

Toward the close of the play Friar Laurence has a great fate quote in which he talks about a higher power of sorts that ruined his plans.  

"A greater power than we can contradict
Hath thwarted our intents."

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