What are some examples of homogeneous mixtures and heterogeneous mixtures?

An example of a homogenous mixture is cranberry juice, as a homogenous mixture is made of multiple substances and has uniform consistency throughout. An example of a heterogenous mixture would be oil mixed with water, because in a heterogenous mixture, there is a visible difference between the different substances in the mixture.

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A homogeneous mixture and a heterogeneous mixture are first and foremost both mixtures.  That means no chemical bonding has occurred between the substances within the mixtures.  They can be separated through physical means if necessary.  

The difference between the two mixtures is in how well they are mixed.  Heterogeneous mixtures are mixtures that are not well mixed.  A person could see the individual pieces that are mixed together.  Foods are often great examples of heterogeneous mixtures.  For example, a fruit salad is a heterogeneous mixture.  So is trail mix and Lucky Charms.  Pepper works too, because you can see all of the different pieces that make up pepper.  

A homogeneous mixture is a mixture that is really well mixed.  It's so well mixed that you can't see the different parts of the mixture.  It all looks uniform.  The air that you are breathing right now is a homogeneous mixture.  It's made up of several different gasses that are so thoroughly mixed together that they appear uniform.  Milk is also a homogeneous mixture.  It looks uniform throughout.  In fact, if you have a gallon of milk in your refrigerator at home, go check the container.  It more than likely says "homogenized."  

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Homogeneity and heterogeneity speak to the distributions of the constituent parts of a sample. 

Homogenous samples have consistent distributions of species throughout, so a snapshot taken from any part of the sample would reveal the same makeup as a snapshot taken anywhere else - think of salt that has been dissolved in a pot of water. 

Heterogenous samples are differentiated in their composition, and a snapshot at one location may reveal a different makeup than a snapshot taken elsewhere. Think of the planet Earth - at its surface it is composed of solids, but towards its core molten metals and other features can be seen.

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Homogeneous mixuters are those in which the components are evenly distributed over the major component/constitute of the mixture.

Eg: blood, milk.

Hetrogeneous mixtures are mixtures are those in which the components are not evenly distributed over the major component/constitute of the mixture.

The very (unevenly distributed) form of heterogeneous mixtures is the  reason why most people shake the mixtures before using them.

Eg: Milk of Magnesia, Copper Sulphate

 

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A compound is a chemical combination of two or more elements in definite proportions. For example, two hydrogen molecules + one oxygen molecule= one water molecule. A solution is a physical combination of two or more chemicals mixed evenly (salt that is dissolved in water). Solutions are also known as homogenous mixtures. A mechanical mixture is a physical combination of two or more chemicals that are not evenly mixed (hot fudge on ice cream). Mechanical mixtures are also known as heterogenous mixtures.

Examples:

Homogenous: milk, kool-aid, blood, lotion, window cleaner, glue, etc.

Heterogenous: pizza, cereal and milk, rocks in the sand at the beach, banana splits, etc.

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