The Monkey's Paw by W. W. Jacobs

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What are some examples of foreshadowing in "The Monkey's Paw"?

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One example of foreshadowing begins with Mrs. White's lighthearted reaction to Sergeant Major Morris's grave explanations of the powers of the monkey's paw:

"Don't you think you might wish for four pairs of hands for me?"

Her husband drew the talisman from his pocket and then all three burst into laughter as the sergeant-major, with a look of alarm on his face, caught him by the arm.

"If you must wish," he said gruffly, "wish for something sensible."

It is clear that the Whites do not believe that any harm can come from wishes, and the stern cautionary statement to "wish for something sensible" foreshadows their later insensible actions, especially the wish to bring their son back from the dead.

Near the end of the story, Mrs. White commands that her husband use the paw to bring her son back to life. As he stumbles through the house considering her demands, there is another example of foreshadowing:

The talisman was in its place, and a horrible fear that the unspoken wish might bring his mutilated son before him ere he could escape from the room seized upon him, and he caught his breath as he found that he had lost the direction of the door.

This foreshadows the knocking that the couple will soon hear at their door, and this image of the "mutilated son" whispers in the reader's ear as the author never directly says who or what is doing the knocking so late at night. Because of this foreshadowing, the reader is led to believe that their "mutilated" son has indeed risen from his grave and at the end stands knocking as a direct result of the powers of the monkey's paw.

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Foreshadowing in "The Monkey's Paw" serves to alert the reader that misfortune may lay ahead.

Foreshadowing: In the exposition Mr. White tries to distract his son from seeing the error he has made in the last move of his chess piece. What is interesting about this foreshadowing is the description of his motive:

Mr. White...having seen a fatal mistake after it was too late, was amiably desirous of preventing his son from seeing it [his move].

Incident that occurs : Later, Mr. White, having made the fatal "move" of wishing on the monkey's paw that the sergeant urged him to throw away, wishes for £200 to pay off his mortgage, and...

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