What are some examples of figurative language in The Jungle chapter 14 by Upton Sinclair?

Sinclair uses imagery, which is description using any of the five senses, to great effect to describe the nauseating filth of the meat-packing plant. In the quote below, he also uses the figurative device of repetition, developing a sense of rhythm by beginning each sentence with "there would be": There would be meat that had tumbled out on the floor, in the dirt and sawdust, where the workers had tramped and spit uncounted billions of consumption germs. There would be meat stored in great piles in rooms; and the water from leaky roofs would drip over it, and thousands of rats would race about on it.

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Sinclair usesimagery, which is description using any of the five senses, to great effect to describe the nauseating filth of the meat-packing plant. In the quote below, he also uses the figurative device of repetition , developing a sense of rhythm by beginning each sentence with "there would...

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Sinclair uses imagery, which is description using any of the five senses, to great effect to describe the nauseating filth of the meat-packing plant. In the quote below, he also uses the figurative device of repetition, developing a sense of rhythm by beginning each sentence with "there would be":

There would be meat that had tumbled out on the floor, in the dirt and sawdust, where the workers had tramped and spit uncounted billions of consumption germs. There would be meat stored in great piles in rooms; and the water from leaky roofs would drip over it, and thousands of rats would race about on it.

Sinclair uses a simile, a comparison that uses the words "like" or "as," when he likens Ona to a bird:

Ona, too, was falling into a habit of silence—Ona, who had once gone about singing like a bird.

Sinclair also employs metaphors, comparisons that do not use the words "like" or "as":

The gates of memory would roll open—old joys would stretch out their arms to them, old hopes and dreams would call to them, and they would stir beneath the burden that lay upon them, and feel its forever immeasurable weight.

Memory is compared to a gate rolling open, while old joys are compared to arms stretching out. Misery is compared to a literal burden weighing on people.

Sinclair also uses assonance, which is using words that begin with the same vowel close together:

anguish would seize them, more dreadful than the agony of death

"Anguish" and "agony" both begin with "a," and the repeated letter puts emphasis on these two important words.

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