What are some adjectives that describe Dolphus Raymond in To Kill a Mockingbird?

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A social pariah in Maycomb, Mr. Dolphus Raymond is non-compliant with the social mores of the white community, free-thinking, unbiased, somewhat misanthropic,gentle-natured, kind, observant, sympathetic, and thoughtful.

  • non-compliant with society and free-thinking

Breaking unwritten social laws, Mr. Dolphus lives by the county line with "a colored woman and...

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A social pariah in Maycomb, Mr. Dolphus Raymond is non-compliant with the social mores of the white community, free-thinking, unbiased, somewhat misanthropic, gentle-natured, kind, observant, sympathetic, and thoughtful.

  • non-compliant with society and free-thinking

Breaking unwritten social laws, Mr. Dolphus lives by the county line with "a colored woman and all sorts of mixed chillun," Jem tells Scout.

In Chapter 20, after Jem and Scout walk an emotionally disquieted Dill outside the courthouse, Mr. Dolphus Raymond approaches the children and offers Dill a sip of his bottle hidden in a paper sack. As he does so, he jokingly asks them not to reveal his secretive drinking of only a Coca-Cola, rather than liquor, as the community believes. He explains that he only pretends to be a drunkard since the community's belief that he is an alcoholic gives them reason to tolerate his living the way he does. 

When I come to town, if I weave a little and drink out of this sack, folks can say Dolphus Raymond's in the clutches of whiskey--that's why he won't change his ways. He can't help himself....

  • unbiased

Mr. Raymond does not believe as many other whites do that the blacks are inferior and there should be no association between the races. He rejects the conventional wisdom and lives his life without bias, staying on the "wrong side of the tracks" and fathering mixed children.

  • misanthropic

Mr. Raymond is fairly disgusted with human nature. He tells Dill,

Cry about the simple hell people give other people--without even thinking. Cry about the hell white people give colored folks, without even stopping to think that they're people, too."

Then, he addresses Scout, informing her that Atticus is not a "run-of-the-mill man," and in a few years she will understand what his remark means. Further, he tells the children to return to the courthouse and they will learn about Maycomb.

  • gentle-natured and kind

Certainly, Mr. Raymond's treatment of Dill and the children demonstrates his kind heart. While he mentions the town, he does not specifically censure any one person or other persons.

  • observant

Quickly, Mr. Raymond observes Dill's discomfiture, and he rushes to aid him by offering his Coca-Cola. In addition, his judgments of the townspeople indicate his powers of observation.

  • sympathetic and thoughtful

Mr. Raymond acts with compassion for Dill, consoling him and offering his Coca-cola to the boy. Further, he remarks that Dill will become more accustomed to the cruelty of men for others, and he will not, then, cry as he does this day: "Let him get a little older and he won't get sick and cry."

 

 

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