What are quotes that represent the characters of Roger Chillingworth, Hester Prynne, and Arthur Dimmesdale in The Scarlet Letter?

What are quotes that represent the characters of Roger Chillingworth, Hester Prynne, and Arthur Dimmesdale in The Scarlet Letter?

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When Chilingworth first arrives in Boston, people are thrilled to have a physician available, and they are even happier when he and the Reverend Arthur Dimmesdale move in together because they believe that the doctor will help to care for the minister's failing health. After some time passes, however, and...

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When Chilingworth first arrives in Boston, people are thrilled to have a physician available, and they are even happier when he and the Reverend Arthur Dimmesdale move in together because they believe that the doctor will help to care for the minister's failing health. After some time passes, however, and Chillingworth begins to grow suspicious of Dimmesdale, his aspect begins to change.

Now, there was something ugly and evil in his face, which they had not previously noticed, and which grew still the more obvious to sight, the oftener they looked upon him. According to the vulgar idea, the fire in his laboratory had been brought from the lower regions, and was fed with infernal fuel; and so, as might be expected, his visage was getting sooty with the smoke. (153)

This quotation helps to show how affected Chillingworth has been by his single-minded desire for revenge. He has gone from a perceptive and intellectual scholar to a man willing to sacrifice his own soul to punish the one who has wronged him.

Dimmesdale, for his part, appears to be locked in conflict with dark forces, though those forces reside within himself too. His peers do not know that he is Hester's co-sinner, and so people develop wrong ideas about him and his morality.

[...] it grew to be a widely diffused opinion, that the Reverend Arthur Dimmesdale, like many other personages of especial sanctity, in all ages of the Christian world, was haunted either by Satan himself, or Satan's emissary, in the guise of old Roger Chillingworth. (153)

Just as people believe that Chillingworth is associated with the Devil, they think of Dimmesdale as being nearly an angel. They are wrong about both: Chillingworth has been corrupted by his obsession with revenge, but he is not a monster—consider the fact that he leaves everything he owns to Pearl. Likewise, Dimmesdale is no angel, as he allows Hester to suffer in silence for years for a crime they both committed.

Hester is an unbelievably strong person: stronger, I would argue, than either of the two men. Largely isolated by her society, she is left to her own thoughts, and they sometimes tend toward the morbid. Of her, the narrator says,

[...] here was wild and ghastly scenery all around her, and a home and comfort nowhere. At times, a fearful doubt strove to possess her soul, whether it were not better to send Pearl at once to heaven, and go herself to such futurity as Eternal Justice should provide. The scarlet letter had not done its office. (201)

She considers how limited her options are in the world due to her sex. She even, according to the above, considers killing Pearl and then herself—sending Pearl "to heaven" at least and herself to wherever "Eternal Justice" determines she must go—rather than carry on. This is how difficult her life is. And yet, she bears it.

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While Nathaniel Hawthorne's The Scarlet Letter, an Early American novel, does not have the detailed character development evinced in more contemporary novels nor the dialogue that also reveals character traits, there are yet observations made by the narrator that characterize the three important personnages, Hester Pyrnne, Arthur Dimmesdale, and Roger Chillingworth. 

As the reader peruses the novel, seeking pregnant passages, he/she may wish to select those passages representative of important traits, and those which indicate significant actions or ideas that relate to themes.  

Hester Prynne

Above all, the warfare of Hester's spirit at that epoch was perpetuated in Pearl. (5)

Like all other joys, she rejected it as sin. (5)

Alone in the world, cast off by it, and with this sole treasure to keep her heart alive, she felt that she possessed indefeasible rights against the world, and was ready to defend them to the death. (8)

Hester's nature showed itself warm and rich....She was self-ordained a Sister of Mercy....The letter was the symbol of her calling.  Such helpfulness was found in her,--so much power to do, ... sympathize,--it meant Able; so strong was Hester Prynne, with a woman's strength. (13)

She assumed a freedom of speculation....In her lonesome cottage,...thoughts visited her such as dared to enter no other dwelling...(13)

... Was existence worth accepting even to the happiest among them?....At times a fearful doubt strove to possess her soul, whether it were not better to send Pearl at once to Heaven, and go herself to such futurity as Eternal Justice should provide.

The scarlet letter had not done its office (13)

...Hester Prynne...glanced her sad eyes downward at the scarlet letter...

Arthur Dimmesdale

...Arthur Dimmesdale, false to God and man, might be, for one moment true!(17)

"The judgment of God is on me...It is too mighty for me to struggle with!"(17)

"If .. I could recall one instant of peace or hope, I would yet endure, for the sake of that earnest of Heaven's mercy. But now...wherefore should I not snatch the solace allowed to the condemned culprit before his execution?...Neither can I any longer live without her companionship; so powerful is she to sustain,--so tender to soothe!  O Thou to whom I dare not lift mine eyes, wilt Thou yet pardon me?" (18)

No man, for any considerable period, can wear one face to himself and another to the multitude, without finally getting bewildered as to which may be the true. (10

"Ha! tempter!  Methinks thou art too late!"..."Thy power is not what it was!  With God's help, I shall escape thee now!" (23)

"But there stood one in midst of you, at whose brand of sin and infamy ye have not shuddered!" (23)

"....It may be, that, when we forgot our God,--when we violated our reverence each for the other's soul,--it was thenceforth vain to hope that we could meet herafter, in an everlasting and pure reunion."(23)

Roger Chillingworth

[to Hester] "We have wronged each other" (4)

"He will be mine!" (4)

His form grew emaciated; his voice, though still rich and sweet, had a certain melancholy prophecy of decay in it. (9)

Had a man seen old Roger Chillinworth, at that moment of his ecstasy, he would have had no need to ask how Satan comports himself when a precious human soul is lost to heaven, and won into his kingdom. (10)

"Thou hast escaped me!" (23)

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