What are literary devices in the book Something Borrowed?

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Literary devices in Something Borrowed include first-person narrative perspective, allusion, and flashback.

In first-person narration, an individual tells the story from their personal point of view. Rachel White is the first-person narrator and protagonist of the novel.

Author Emily Griffin frequently uses allusion, which is reference to events, objects,...

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Literary devices in Something Borrowed include first-person narrative perspective, allusion, and flashback.

In first-person narration, an individual tells the story from their personal point of view. Rachel White is the first-person narrator and protagonist of the novel.

Author Emily Griffin frequently uses allusion, which is reference to events, objects, or literary works. The author uses popular culture to convey the materialism that absorbs the characters, especially Darcy, as well as to locate the story in time. The allusions are often to brands, such as Rolex; musical artists, such as Michael Jackson; or television shows, such as L.A. Law. These are all associated with particular periods.

Rachel and her best friend Darcy have been close since childhood, and throughout the novel, there are numerous flashbacks to earlier decades. A flashback is a scene that takes place in a different period than the main narrative. It may be a character's memory of a significant event from their past, sometimes including a triggering event or recalled repressed memory. Rachel’s flashback help reveal Darcy as a manipulative person rather than the loyal friend Rachel wants to believe she is.

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