Frankenstein Questions and Answers
by Mary Shelley

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What are Frankenstein's (the creature's) final words in Frankenstein by Mary Shelley?

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After Victor Frankenstein asks his new friend, Captain Walton, to kill the Creature Victor created, Victor himself dies. As Victor predicted, the Creature does come to Victor's deathbed, and Walton finds him there; however, Walton cannot bring himself to kill the Creature. The Creature admits that killing innocent people was torture to him, and although he is horrible to look at, he is obviously a being with intelligence, compassion, and a conscience. Ultimately, though, the Creature says that he will kill himself because he has no more reason to live. To Walton, he says,

"soon . . . I shall die, and what I now feel be no longer felt. Soon these burning miseries will be extinct. I shall ascend my funeral pile triumphantly and exult in the agony of the torturing flames. The light of that conflagration will fade away; my ashes will be swept into the sea by the winds. My spirit will sleep in peace, or if it thinks, it will surely think thus. Farewell."

The Creature plans to self-immolate, burning his body alive while he awaits death. He seems to feel that it will be a just punishment for his wrongdoings. Then, he hopes, he will finally find some peace. It is a scene that seems designed to inspire compassion in the reader.

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mkcapen1 | Student

In the last Chapter, Chapter 24, the creature is at Frankenstein's deathbed.  He looks over him and tells the narrator about his own plight and suffering.  He explains to him that he has been accused and sought out for his crimes but the ones who had hurt him will never suffer for their actions.  He becomes filled with remorse that he ahs played revenge against Victor, but he still has anger at having been created.  He realizes that with Victor gone he has no need to exist and that the memory of them both will fade.

But soon," he cried with sad and solemn enthusiasm, "I shall die, and what I now feel be no longer felt. Soon these burning miseries will be extinct. I shall ascend my funeral pile triumphantly and exult in the agony of the torturing flames. The light of that conflagration will fade away; my ashes will be swept into the sea by the winds. My spirit will sleep in peace, or if it thinks, it will not surely think thus. Farewell."(199)

Following the stating of his last words, Frankenstein's creation climbs on a raft where he is taken away deep into the night by the waves.