What are Francis Bacon's views on studies in his essay "Of Studies"?

In "Of Studies," Francis Bacon argues that studies are useful for "delight," "ornament," and "ability." In Bacon's view, studies help enrich life for both enjoyment and practical purposes. However, Bacon also believes that moderation is necessary for studies to be most useful. One shouldn't study so much that it distracts them from actually applying their studies and living.

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Bacon begins this essay by arguing that studies are good for a number of reasons: "for delight, for ornament, and for ability." In other words, studying makes a man happy, enjoyable to be around, and competent to participate in the society of other educated men. Bacon is suggesting that a balanced program of study makes a person complete and well-rounded. He goes on to argue that books, and study more broadly, teaches people not just to read, but how to observe the world as a whole. He is not arguing that study should be pursued for its own sake alone. Rather, he claims that a balanced and critical approach to reading...

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