What are four literary devices used in the play A Midsummer Night's Dream with their act, scene, and line numbers?

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In act II, scene i, starting at line 233, Shakespeare uses the literary device of monologue. A monologue is like a soliloquy in being a speech that expresses a character's thoughts. It differs from a soliloquy in that other characters—or a character—are onstage. They hear it being delivered. Oberon...

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In act II, scene i, starting at line 233, Shakespeare uses the literary device of monologue. A monologue is like a soliloquy in being a speech that expresses a character's thoughts. It differs from a soliloquy in that other characters—or a character—are onstage. They hear it being delivered. Oberon has a long monologue in this act, with Puck at his side. This allows Shakespeare, through Oberon, to describe the fairy world.

This monologue employs imagery, which is description using any of the five senses of sight, sound, taste, touch, or smell. Oberon depicts a sensuous natural world:

I know a bank where the wild thyme blows,
Where oxlips and the nodding violet grows,
Quite overcanopied with luscious woodbine,
With sweet musk roses and with eglantine.

We can imagine a lush place full of colorful flowers and sweet smells from Oberon's description. Touch (tactile) imagery emerges in the movement of the thyme blowing in the wind. We note too that Shakespeare is using rhyming couplets in this monologue, emphasizing that this is the formal speech of a monarch, not merely everyday conversation.

In act III, scene i, Titania uses personification. Personification occurs when an animal or an inanimate object is given human characteristics. Titania states:

The moon, methinks, looks with a wat'ry eye;
And when she weeps, weeps every little flower

Titania describes the moon as gazing with a watery eye and weeping as a human being would. It would be typical of the fairies, living in such close harmony with nature, to assign it human attributes.

Titania also uses alliteration in these lines, which is when words beginning with the same consonant are placed in close proximity. Titania uses "m" alliteratively in the "moon, methinks," and in the "w" sounds of "wat'ry" and "weeps." Another literary device she employs is the repetition of weeps, which places emphasis on that sad word.

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Shakespeare uses rich language in his plays, including A Midsummer Night's Dream. The following are just a few examples of literary devices in the text.

I am your spaniel, and, Demetrius,

The more you beat me I will fawn on you (2.1)

This is a metaphor, as Helena compares herself to a spaniel. She says she is loyal and will follow Demetrius the way a dog would follow its master no matter what. She is trying to tell him that he cannot chase her away, no matter how mean he is to her.

Vile thing, let loose,

Or I will shake thee from me like a serpent (3.2)

Lysander says this to Hermia when he is entranced. Hermia is his love, but under the spell he is entranced by Helena. He tells Hermia to let him go, using alliteration in "let loose" and a simile comparing her to a snake that he will shake off.

The story shall be changed:

Apollo flies and Daphne holds the chase (2.1)

Helena makes an allusion to the myth of Apollo and Daphne. She tells us the story will be different; instead of Apollo chasing Daphne, the roles are reversed, since she is the one pursuing Demetrius.

The iron tongue of midnight hath told twelve. (5.1)

Theseus uses personification in this quote. At midnight, a clock would chime twelve times. Theseus calls this an "iron tongue," giving the time a human quality.

Whereat, with blade, with bloody, blameful blade,

He bravely broached his boiling, bloody breast. (5.1)

Quince says this as part of the prologue in the play within the play. His alliteration and repetition add to the comedy of the scene.

These examples demonstrate how some quotes hold more than one literary device. These are some examples of alliteration, repetition, allusion, personification, simile, and metaphor.

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Literary devices provide a freshness to literature that embellishes meaning and expression and enjoyment. 

1.  In the opening of the play A Midsummer Night's Dream, Theseus, the Duke of Athens, personifies the moon, giving it the ability to see (behold),

And then the moon, like to a silver bow
New-bent in heaven, shall behold the night [personification]
Of our solemnities. (1.1.9-11)

2.  There is also a simile in these lines a the moon is compared to a silver bow using "like."  Similes make comparisons using the words like or as.

Another simile appears in Act II when Helena begs Demetrius not to run away from her even though, as she declares, "No, no , I am as ugly as a bear...."  (2.2.21)

3. Later in this second act, Lyslander speaks and uses a metaphor, an implied, unstated comparison between two unlike things.  In this scene, Lysander denies that he loves Hermia, and says that he loves Helena instead,

Not Hermia but Helena I love:

Who will not change a raven for a dove?

The will of man is by his reason sway'd

And reason says you are the worthier maid. (2.2.116-119)

Hermia is compared to a raven, while Helena is the dove.  Another metaphor comes a few lines later:

And leads me to your eyes, where I o'erlook
Love's stories, written in Love's richest book. (2.2.125)

4. In Act III, there is alliteration, the repetition of beginning cosonant sounds.  Here it the /s/.  Alliteration makes a line seem faster.

Sever themselves and madly sweep the sky,
So, at his sight, away his fellows fly;(3.2.24-25)

 

 

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