What are examples of foreshadowing in Doctor Faustus?

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Christopher Marlowe frequently foreshadows the inevitable fate of Dr. Faustus because of his infernal bargain. He does this by means of the chorus, the protagonist's own stated fears, the comments of other characters, and even through supernatural manifestations.

The chorus calls the youthful Dr. Faustus prideful and conceited....

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Christopher Marlowe frequently foreshadows the inevitable fate of Dr. Faustus because of his infernal bargain. He does this by means of the chorus, the protagonist's own stated fears, the comments of other characters, and even through supernatural manifestations.

The chorus calls the youthful Dr. Faustus prideful and conceited. His audience knows what comes before a fall. Reading Jerome's Bible, Faustus notes that the consequences of sin are death. He resorts to Sophistry and claims the same fate will come to him no matter what he does. The good angel directly tells Faustus to lay down his book of conjuring lest it brings heavy wrath upon his head.

When the protagonist says, "This night I'll conjure tho' I'll die therefore . . ." he his explicitly foreshadowing his own death. His acquaintances express fear that his damned art will be the danger of his soul. They talk of their fears that nothing will reclaim him now despite their intervention. When Faustus makes out the famous contract his blood freezes and a supernatural mark even appears on his arm as a warning. The chorus compares his impending downfall to that of Icarus.

There is little doubt left in the reader's mind that, having prayed and sacrificed to the infernal powers and enjoyed the power the devil promised him on earth, the Faustus of the play is bound to lose his soul in the afterlife.

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There are many elements of foreshadowing in Dr. Faustus.

The crudest and most obvious is the title, which tells you his history is tragic. That means things will end badly for him. If you know what a tragedy meant historically, in other plays, it specifically means he’ll overreach due to ego (the flaw of pride known as hubris), which Faustus definitely does.

However, there are definitely other more specific elements of foreshadowing. Look at the opening section of the play, where you’ll see these lines:

“Till swoln with cunning, of a self-conceit,    

His waxen wings did mount above his reach,    

And, melting, heavens conspir'd his overthrow;    

For, falling to a devilish exercise,    

And glutted now with learning's golden gifts,    

He surfeits upon cursed necromancy;    

Nothing so sweet as magic is to him...” 

Here the chorus compares him to Icarus from Greek mythology, who didn’t listen to wise council but instead flew too high, only to have his wings melt, leaving him to fall to his death. That comparison tells you that Faustus will soar high (metaphorically), and then crash (fatally).

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