What are a few ways/instances where Starr Carter comes off as relatable during the beginning of the novel The Hate U Give (chapters 1–4)?

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In The Hate U Give, Starr Carter comes off as relatable through her language, her allusions to popular culture, and her brutally honest perspective.

From the opening lines, Starr draws readers in to her story through her frank use of language, including some popular slang:

I'm not even sure...

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In The Hate U Give, Starr Carter comes off as relatable through her language, her allusions to popular culture, and her brutally honest perspective.

From the opening lines, Starr draws readers in to her story through her frank use of language, including some popular slang:

I'm not even sure I belong at this party. That's not on some bougie shit, either. There are just some places where it's not enough to be me. Either version of me.

Starr's language captures a particularly raw perspective of her environment, especially as she genuinely shares her struggles about feelings of self-doubt and of her feelings of social discord.

Starr also alludes to popular culture, which makes her more relatable. She imagines a new show titled Extreme Makeover: Starr Edition. She includes some text message conversations, using text abbreviations and slang. She and her father discuss Tupac and analyze his relevancy. These points of reference to popular culture characterize Starr as an authentic and typical teenage girl.

Starr's most brutal moment of keen perspective occurs as she witnesses Khalil's murder. When they are pulled over, Starr's internal dialogue reflects her ability to be strategic about her own actions in that precarious situation. Starr recalls all that her father has taught her, memorizing the officer's badge number and being careful to keep her hands exactly where instructed.

To her horror, Khalil breaks the officer's commands. As Starr watches, Khalil is shot three times, looking at Starr "stunned" as he gasps for his final breaths. This scene makes Starr more relatable because readers become personally invested in the outcome of this tragedy, particularly because she offers such a forthright perspective about the shooting and about her pain that follows.

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