What are 5 symbols of Atticus Finch and why are these symbols?

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1. The "unsullied" Code of Alabama in Atticus 's office symbolizes his idea of fairness and his belief that everybody is equal in a US court of law. Regardless of race, gender, class, or religion, Atticus believes that everyone should be treated fairly. His firm belief in the importance of...

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1. The "unsullied" Code of Alabama in Atticus's office symbolizes his idea of fairness and his belief that everybody is equal in a US court of law. Regardless of race, gender, class, or religion, Atticus believes that everyone should be treated fairly. His firm belief in the importance of justice is why he valiantly defends an innocent black man in front of a racist jury.

2. The checkboard in Atticus's office symbolically represents his calculating, astute nature as an expert lawyer. During the Tom Robinson trial, Atticus presents a moving argument and cleverly proves his client's innocence. He always seems to be one step ahead of the prosecution in the courtroom, which is why he is such an esteemed lawyer.

3. A newspaper is another symbol associated with Atticus and represents his affinity for reading. Atticus is often seen reading a newspaper, and Scout mentions that this is his favorite pastime. Atticus's name and his commitment to defending Tom Robinson are also written about in the local newspaper. He becomes a popular figure throughout Maycomb, and many racist people view him with contempt.

4. Atticus's glasses symbolically represent his intelligence and perspective on life. Atticus has the uncanny ability to view situations from other people's point of view and sympathize with them. He also looks past the surface and does not judge people by their appearances.

5. Atticus's three-piece suit symbolically represents his professional status as an esteemed lawyer. Atticus's suit indicates that he takes his job seriously and will not be distracted from his duties in court. He wears this suit during the Tom Robinson trial but ends up taking off his jacket and unbuttoning his vest in order to appear more down-to-earth to the jury.

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Atticus Finch is presented as an attorney, a father, and a community member. He is a calm, serious man with a keen sense of responsibility and duty. Atticus is both modest and realistic; he does not seek glory but always does the best job he can.

One key symbol of Atticus, as well as some other characters, in this novel is the mockingbird. Atticus, like this bird, does not harm anyone. His words in defending Tom are symbolized by the mockingbird’s songs.

Another symbol of Atticus is the rifle. His skill as a sure-shot stands for his skill as an attorney: he zeroes in on the target to attack, then goes at it with surgical precision.

The newspaper is another symbol; he is shown reading the paper many times during the course of the novel, and Scout even comments that that's all he ever does. The newspaper stands both for his intellectual tendencies and for his connection to the world beyond Maycomb.

Related to reading is his eyeglasses, which he needs because he is nearly blind in one eye. This blindness can stand for his connection to justice (archetypically depicted as blind).

Atticus’s suit, especially the coat, symbolizes his professional status but also the formality of his character. Scout is shocked when he removes his coat in the courtroom as he is delivering his final statement, as he rarely removes an article of clothing in front of people.

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The moral voice of To Kill a Mockingbird, Atticus Finch possesses many sterling qualities that are displayed throughout the novel.  While there are many qualities that render themselves to symbolic representation, here are a few suggestions

  1. the finch- Since this is the surname of Atticus, this little bird must be used by Harper Lee for good reason.  He is a community bird, for one thing; Atticus, too, certainly has a strong sense of community as he always tries to maintain amicable relations with his neighbors and townspeople.  Also, the little bird possesses a gentle personality just as Atticus does.  Whenever there is conflict, Atticus calmly explains what is right to the children.
  2. spectacles/eyeglasses - Atticus is known for having a bad eye, yet he can still shoot well.  He compensates for his weak eyesight by understanding that he must "climb into the skin" of others in order to be objective about them.
  3. the Mobile Register - Atticus is a very literate man who teaches his children so subtly that they do not even realize they are learning.  Miss Caroline is upset that her father has already taught her to read, but Scout does not know when he has done so; she believes that she just picked up the paper one day and read.  In addition, this newspaper can symbolize Atticus as he is very civic and extends his horizons beyond Maycomb.
  4. the courthouse/courtroom-  As a lawyer and representative of Maycomb, Atticus strives to be fair to all.  He defends the rights of the oppressed Tom Robinson because he does not want his children to grow up with the "usual disease" of Maycomb.
  5. a three-pieced pinstriped suit- Always a gentleman, Atticus is well-bred and kind.  In the film version of the novel, he is always portrayed as wearing his suits.
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