What are 3 examples of Laurie's bad behavior at home in the story "Charles"?

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Laurie speaks insolently to his parents, spills the baby’s milk, and calls his father names.

Laurie’s parents seem to have no idea that the boy whose bad behavior he describes every day is actually him.  Laurie’s behavior at home clearly demonstrates that he is a handful, but his parents are...

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Laurie speaks insolently to his parents, spills the baby’s milk, and calls his father names.

Laurie’s parents seem to have no idea that the boy whose bad behavior he describes every day is actually him.  Laurie’s behavior at home clearly demonstrates that he is a handful, but his parents are distracted by the increasingly bizarre behavior he reports every day from his classmate Charles.

At home, Laurie often slams doors, yells, and treats his parents disrespectfully. His parents make no connection between this behavior and Charles’s school antics. They do not even seem to notice that their son is obnoxious at home. They have a new baby that often takes some of their attention.

On Laurie’s first day, he comes home slamming the door and yelling because no one instantly acknowledged his presence.

At lunch he spoke insolently to his father, spilled his baby sister’s milk, and remarked that his teacher said we were not to take the name of the Lord in vain.

His parents do not seem to make the connection between this behavior and the descriptions of the behavior of Charles. Laurie goes seamlessly from his gleeful accounts of the fictional Charles’s bad behavior to being bad himself at home with his parents. His parents either ignore it or are distracted by Charles.

“What did he do?” I asked.

“He just sat there,” Laurie said, climbing into his chair at the table. “Hi, Pop, y’old dust mop.”

“Charles had to stay after school today,” I told my husband. “Everyone stayed with him.”

Laurie’s parents seem unaware that their son is struggling in school, and apparently the teacher thinks it is better to just sit back and wait until he settles down. He does begin to behave more appropriately as time goes on, and by the time Laurie’s mother finally makes it to a parent-teacher conference, he is no longer the Charles he has been describing for so long.

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In "Charles," Laurie's mother anticipates some behavioral changes when her son starts kindergarten, so she is not too surprised when Laurie is rude to his parents when he comes home from school. Arriving home after his first day, he throws his things down and yells. The rudeness appears irregularly, accompanied by bad jokes and insults at his parents' expense.

In addition to making impolite remarks and demands, Laurie becomes very self-centered. He dominates the conversation with endless stories from his day at school. He is especially impressed by Charles's antics, his disrespect for the teacher and the other students alike, and his outright violence.

The plot of the story hinges on the biggest example of his bad behavior, lying, which for weeks goes completely unnoticed by his parents. He has lied about everything Charles did: Charles does not exist.

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In "Charles," most of Laurie's misbehavior at home is disrespect and bad manners.  Since we only see him interacting with his parents, this is directed toward them.  There are several examples in the story.

The narrator, Laurie's mother, describes how he comes home from his first day of school,

...the front door slamming open, his cap on the floor, and the voice suddenly become raucous shouting, 'Isn't anyone here?' (1)

Slamming the door, throwing his cap on the floor, and disrespectfully shouting in the house are all clearly bad behavior.

Additional instances of Laurie's bad manners and disrespect occur at the dinner table that night. His father asks him what he has learned and,

Laurie regarded his father coldly. 'I didn't learn nothing,' he said (1).

We are told that he was speaking with his mouth full during this conversation, and then,

Laurie slid off his chair, took a cookie and left, while his father was still saying, 'See here, young man' (1).

So, Laurie is disrespectful to his father, speaks ungrammatically, probably deliberately, speaks with his mouth full, does not seem to finish his dinner but takes a cookie, nevertheless, and leaves the table without asking to be excused, while his father is still speaking to him.

These may all seem like minor infractions, but it is clear that the "sweetvoiced nursery-school tot" (1) has come home a very different child! 

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Three examples of Laurie's behavior at home:

1) On the first day home from kindergarten, Laurie is rude to his father at lunch, spills his baby sister's milk, and tells his parents that, according to his teacher, they are not supposed to take the name of the Lord in vain. He informs his parents that a boy (Charles) was spanked on the first day because he was 'fresh' to the teacher. When his father asks him what the boy did, Laurie leaves without answering.

2) On the second day home from kindergarten, Laurie again talks about the trouble-prone Charles. This time, Charles was spanked for hitting the teacher. After telling his parents about Charles' antics, Laurie tells his father to look up, to look down, and finally, to look at his thumb. When his father does all these things as told, Laurie laughs uproariously and informs his father that he is dumb.

3) On Monday the following week, Laurie comes home late. He yells all the way up the hill that Charles was bad again that day. Accordingly, Charles yelled so loudly at school that he had to stay late. He tells his mother and father that all the other children stayed late as well to watch what Charles would do. When his father asks what Charles did, Laurie tells him that Charles just sat there without doing anything. Laurie then proceeds to greet his father by addressing him as an 'old dust mop.'

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