What are 2 popular metaphors in the book Cutting for Stone?

Two of the popular metaphors in Cutting for Stone are the story of Abu Kassem, in which the old merchant's slippers represent the deeds of a lifetime and Matron's comparison of a human being to musical instrument that belongs to God.

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One of the many metaphors in Cutting for Stone is related in the story of the Baghdad merchant, Abu Kassem. Despite his wealth, the old man held onto his battered old slippers, until one day even he could no longer bear to look at them. He threw the slippers out...

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One of the many metaphors in Cutting for Stone is related in the story of the Baghdad merchant, Abu Kassem. Despite his wealth, the old man held onto his battered old slippers, until one day even he could no longer bear to look at them. He threw the slippers out of the window, but they landed on the head of a pregnant woman, who suffered a miscarriage. Then he threw them in the canal, where they blocked the drain and caused a flood. When he was sent to jail for this, another prisoner told Abu Kassem that there was no point in trying to get rid of his slippers. He might as well build a special room for them in his house, and admit his ownership. Abu Kassem seemed happy upon hearing this, and that night he died in his sleep. This extended metaphor is explained as follows:

The slippers in the story mean that everything you see and do and touch, every seed you sow, or don't sow, becomes part of your destiny...In order to start to get rid of your slippers, you have to admit they are yours, and if you do, then they will get rid of themselves.

Matron uses another metaphor when Marion asks why he must always do whatever is hardest. Matron replies that he is an instrument of God. This instrument must neither be left sitting in the case, nor used to play childish tunes. It should be used to play the Gloria. When Marion protests that he could not possibly play Bach, Matron replies:

No, not Bach's Gloria. Yours! Your Gloria lives within you. The greatest sin is not finding it, ignoring what God made possible in you.

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