What are Andrew Bennett and Nicholas Royle essentially saying in thier 1995 Pleasure?

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literaturenerd | High School Teacher | (Level 2) Educator Emeritus

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Essentially, in Andrew Bennett and Nicholas Royle's 1995 essay Pleasure, they are saying that pleasure can exist in two very distinct ways when examined within literature. First, pleasure can be found by reading. The reader can find pleasure within a text for the way it transports them to another place, into another life. In the same way that literature can move a person (a pleasurable experience), literature can be about pleasure (the erotic nature found between the characters to which the text is focused upon).

For Bennett and Royle, literature moves people, it seduces them. This seduction, according to the authors, is the reason why some people read--in order to be seduced. The authors tend to personify words in regards to give words the power to seduce (in the same way people can seduce).

In the end, both Bennett and Royle seem to be suggesting one thing: that authors need to seduce their readers through word choice.

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