What is an example of an internal and an external conflict in Part 2 of Fahrenheit 451?

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In Part Two, one example of an internal conflict comes from the way that Montag feels about society. He is desperate to better understand the world. Specifically, he wants to understand why they are rich and the rest of the world is poor and why they're well-fed but the rest...

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In Part Two, one example of an internal conflict comes from the way that Montag feels about society. He is desperate to better understand the world. Specifically, he wants to understand why they are rich and the rest of the world is poor and why they're well-fed but the rest of the world is starving. For Montag, he cannot reconcile his feelings with his limited understanding of the world. It is this conflict which prompts Montag to seek out Professor Faber. More importantly, it causes Montag to break the rules by asking Faber about how many books remain in existence.

In terms of external conflict, Montag faces a conflict with Beatty. While Montag is no longer sure about his role as a fireman (another example of internal conflict), Beatty is determined to keep him in the fireman system. It is this external conflict with Beatty which leads to their showdown in Part Three and the death of Captain Beatty.

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Part 2 of Fahrenheit 451 is the section of the novel in which Montag has discovered books and tries to better himself to understand them. He seeks out Faber and learns what he can about the truth about the past and why it is that books are prohibited. He tries to break free from thinking as the propaganda from his country has brainwashed him to think.

His internal conflict in the chapter is that he wavers between being anti-government/anti-firefighters to feeling guilty for reading and having books in his possession. He cannot decide whether or not to confess to his boss or to continue trying to decipher the content of the novels.

His external conflict in the chapter is again between Montag and his boss, Captain Beatty. Beatty and Montag are at the fire station after Montag left Faber. The fire alarm sounds, and they take off to Montag's house where it is in flames.

 

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