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What is an "extended passage of dialogue?"

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booboosmoosh eNotes educator | Certified Educator

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I am not aware of specific rules for writing an extended passage of dialogue, but I expect it is the same as writing dialogue, except that there is no narration included.

For example, when reading a book, there is often dialogue mixed in with descriptions of setting, other characters, plot development, etc.  I would expect that with an extended passage of dialogue, you would simply write dialogue without interrupting the flow of speaking.  Open a novel and look for examples.

A passage indicates a section that is extended; it cannot be a short writing.  To this end, the content of the passage should be well-developed with a specific purpose in mind.

If you haven't been given a prompt, I would imagine a situation that you feel compelled to discuss put into dialogue would come more easily, or perhaps a conversation you wish you could have with someone, but make sure the topic has substance, meaning.  Provide both sides of the conversation, one speaker to another.  Make sure to use quotation marks at the beginning of the passage, and after the end punctuation.  For example, "Sally sells seashells at the seashore."  (The period goes inside the end quotation mark.)

Avoid filler: like running on with words without clear intention.  Your professor will see through it immediately.  If you talk for extended periods of time on the phone or participate in debates with friends, etc., use one of these conversations as a model: writing from something important to you provides credibility to your writing.

In terms of conversational tags (he said/she said phrases), without specific instructions, I would avoid them.  (she said, he explained, they pondered,...

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