What is an example of stage directions in The Bear by Chekhov? Why are the stage directions significant?

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In Chekhov's The Bear, two examples of significant stage directions can be found at the drama's beginning and ending.

When Smirnov first enters, the stage directions reflect a significant part of his characterization .  His entrance has him speaking to Popova "with respect."  It is very important that the...

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In Chekhov's The Bear, two examples of significant stage directions can be found at the drama's beginning and ending.

When Smirnov first enters, the stage directions reflect a significant part of his characterization.  His entrance has him speaking to Popova "with respect."  It is very important that the first stage direction involves him speaking in a deferential tone to Popova.  As the drama unfolds, this tone will significantly change.  Chekhov includes the stage direction to show a starting point, an emotional benchmark that we can use to ascertain how much change will take place in Smirnov's characterization. 

Another significant stage direction takes place at the end of the drama. Smirnov has changed from speaking to Popova with respect, to addressing her with intense anger, to being infatuated.  After insisting on a duel, he becomes smitten with her.  While she still demands satisfaction in terms of a duel, he approaches her with his newly discovered emotion. Chekhov's stage directions indicate that the two share "a prolonged kiss." It is clear that she feels something that is different than her intense anger and the mourning for her husband that was such a part of her character.  The "prolonged" direction shows a spark between them both.  When Luka enters with the gardener, workman, and coachman, they are ready to break up a potential fight.  Instead, they see this deep kiss between the two former enemies.  As the kiss ends, Chekhov's stage directions indicate that she is "lowering her eyes." This stage direction is significant in its confirmation that she has feelings for Smirnov, bringing forth the drama's comedic end.

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