What is an example of soliloquy?Preferably from The Crucible, The Great Gatsby, The Count of Monte Cristo, The Twilight Saga, To Kill A Mockingbird, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Of Mice and...

What is an example of soliloquy?

Preferably from The Crucible, The Great Gatsby, The Count of Monte Cristo, The Twilight Saga, To Kill A Mockingbird, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Of Mice and Men, or Titanic.

Asked on by hgw15

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william1941's profile pic

william1941 | College Teacher | (Level 3) Valedictorian

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In the Crucible, at the end of Act 2, John Proctor faces the open sky and declares:

"Peace. It is a providence, and no great change; we are only what we always were, but naked now. . . Aye, naked! And the wind, God's icy wind will blow!"

This is an example of a soliloquy. A Soliloquy is an audible oratory or conversation with oneself. It is a term that is typically applied to theatrical characters engaged in a monologue. But it can also be used as a term in a literary work that simply describes an occurrence when a character talks with oneself. The soliloquy helps in the realization by the character of certain things that may not have been realized if he had not verbalized aloud.

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tfgrrl | Middle School Teacher | (Level 1) eNoter

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Probably the most famous soliloquy is Hamlet's "To Be or Not to Be" monologue which is also used by Mark Twain in The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. In Chapter 21 the Duke attempts this from memory and doesn't quite end up with what Shakespeare wrote.

In To Kill a Mockingbird Atticus Finch gives a very impassioned speech to the jury in his closing arguments for Tom Robinson's defense.

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