What is an example of Macbeth's stubbornness?

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mwestwood | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

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1. With the denotation of stubbornness as "the quality of having a fixed or set purpose; resolute," one example of Macbeth's stubbornness is his engagement in battle with Macdonwald near Forres. As the bleeding captain, who has just returned from battle, describes what has occurred with the battle against the traitor Macdonwald in Act I, Scene 2, he mentions that Macbeth was fixed upon his purpose (stubborn), and attacked Macdonwald as he "carved out his passage/Till he faced the slave" (1.2.19-20).  Further, Macbeth continued to demonstrate his bravery

Till he faced the slave:
Which nev'r shook hands, nor bade farewell to him, 
Till he unseamed him from the nave to th'chops,
And fixed his head upon the battlements. (1.2.23-24)

2. With the denotation of stubbornness as "obstinately maintained as a course of action," Macbeth exhibits stubbornness at the end of the play in Act V, Scene 8 as Birnam Wood appears to move according the the prophesy of the witches. To himself he asks why he should just throw himself upon his sword like Brutus or Cassius when they were losing against Marc Antony and the others in Phillipi. Instead, he vows to fight until the end. When Macduff accosts him in the battlefields before Inverness castle, Macbeth responds to Macduff's order to "turn, hell-hound, turn!" by saying,

I will not yield,
To kiss the ground before young Malcolm’s feet,
And to be baited with the rabble’s curse.
Though Birnam Wood be come to Dunsinane,
And thou opposed, being of no woman born,
Yet I will try the last. Before my body
I throw my warlike shield....(5.8.27-33) 
 
To the end, Macbeth offers a stubborn resistance to the forces of Malcolm and Macduff.
 
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daljit | eNotes Newbie

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Another example of Macbeth's stubbornness is when at the end, he is faced by Macduff. due to the apparitions of the witches, he now knows that he cannot win a battle with Macduff, because he was born by caesarean section; in other words he could not have been sane to be "born", which is the last of the prophecies fulfilled.

Despite this, he still decides to fight on;

"I will not yield,
To kiss the ground before young Malcolm's feet,
And to be baited with the rabble's curse.
Though Birnam Wood be come to Dunsinane,(35)
And thou opposed, being of no woman born,
Yet I will try the last. Before my body
I throw my warlike shield! Lay on, Macduff,
And damn'd be him that first cries, “Hold, enough!” "

this is macbeth's last speech and his final act before dying

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