What is an example of a literary device in Act III, Scene II of Macbeth

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When Lady Macbeth tells Macbeth to "sleek o'er your rugged looks," she is using a rhetorical device known as anthimeria. Anthimeria is when a writer uses one part of speech to serve as another. "Sleek" is an adjective, but by using "sleek" as a command, Lady Macbeth turns it into a verb, telling Macbeth to smooth his face out so he doesn't give them away. Shakespeare also uses rhyming couplets to great effect in this scene; in fact, pairs of couplets bookend it. We begin with Lady Macbeth saying "naught's had, all's spent / Where our desire is got without content. / 'Tis better to be that which we destroy / Than by destruction dwell in doubtful joy" and end with Macbeth saying "Good things of day begin to droop and drowse, / Whiles night’s black agents to their preys do rouse.— / Thou marvel’st at my words, but hold thee still. / Things bad begun make strong themselves by ill." In both cases, the repeated couplet shows that the character was not satisfied with their first statement and felt...

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