What is an example of assonance in the prologue to Romeo and Juliet? i really need help with this! its due tomorrow!

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As the other educator states, assonance is defined as the repetition of internal vowel sounds in a series of words or phrases.

In the prologue of Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet, assonance is used to emphasize the importance of the information to the audience.

Two examples of this come near...

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As the other educator states, assonance is defined as the repetition of internal vowel sounds in a series of words or phrases.

In the prologue of Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet, assonance is used to emphasize the importance of the information to the audience.

Two examples of this come near the end of the prologue:

Is now the two hours’ traffic of our stage;
The which if you with patient ears attend . . . (lines 12–13)

The words “now,” “hours,” and “our” all contain the same sound. This creates a sense of unity within the line itself. In line 13, “which” and “with” both contain the short “i” sound.

Prologues are a feature found in ancient Greek tragedies, which Shakespeare would have known. Understanding that the lines of these ancient Greek plays would have been memorized, then performed, the use of sound devices like assonance help make these lines more memorable. Shakespeare’s use of rhyme and other sound devices like assonance certainly would have helped his Elizabethan actors perform.

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Assonance is when you have similar vowel sounds occurring in a number of words.  So it is sort of like rhyming, except it does not generally come at the end of a word.

I think you can see examples of assonance right at the start of the Prologue.  For example, Shakespeare writes

Two households, both alike in dignity,

To me, the "o" sound in "holds" is the same as the one in "both."  I also think that the "i" sound in "in" is the same as the second one in "dignity."  So, to me, both of those are examples of assonance.

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